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Daniel Stevens
and
Nick Vaughan-Williams

; Pyszczynski et al., 2002 ). The Madrid bombing in 2004 resulted in greater hostility not only towards Arabs, who shared the ethnicity of the perpetrators, but also towards Jews, suggesting that threats may lead to a broader lashing-out against outgroups (Echebarria-Echabe and Fernandez-Guede, 2006 ). Finseraas et al. ( 2011 ) also find some effects on attitudes towards immigration in Western Europe following the Theo Van Gogh murder

in Everyday security threats
Daniel Stevens
and
Nick Vaughan-Williams

and affect towards other minorities – immigrants from Eastern Europe in this case – as they appear to have done in Spain after the Madrid train attack, when attitudinal prejudices rose not only towards Arabs but also towards Jews (Echebarria-Echabe and Fernandez-Guede, 2006 ). Table 4.6 Perceptions of specific threats and attitudes

in Everyday security threats
Everyday life in interface areas
Madeleine Leonard

started? Protestant Boy 1: Cause there were two different religions. M: So it was because there were two different religions. Protestant Boy 1: Yeah that’s probably why, cause the Catholics didn’t want Protestants here. Protestant Boy 2: Cause one wanted one leader and one wanted another leader. Protestant Boy 3: Why do Jews and Hindus not fight then? M: Why

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Heike Wieters

were white, with “disproportionally fewer Catholics and disproportionally more Jews in the donor group than in the public generally.” While this alone was not necessarily a reason for concern, the study also underscored that younger people, while “more receptive to CARE in a variety of ways,” were, paradoxically, very under-represented among the CARE donor group. 138 This finding pointed to the

in The NGO CARE and food aid From America, 1945–80
Israeli security experience as an international brand
Erella Grassiani

insignia. As the company explains, this eagle with batwings behind it was chosen to symbolise strength, readiness, and superiority. 6 Another US company, which was founded by an American Jew who joined the IDF and served in a special combat unit, portrays a shooter with a handgun, above him a text in Hebrew which says ‘Counter Terror School’. 7 Beneath the shooting figure we find the English translation. A third US company also

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Alexis Heraclides
and
Ada Dialla

not intervene militarily on behalf of the Jews of Russia or the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire? 6 And why did the US intervene only in Cuba and not in, say, oppressive regimes of South America, which instead it chose to support? 7 But as even Franck and Rodley are prepared to accept, the Greek case and some others against the Ottoman Empire ‘are probably not to be dismissed as bogus. At least they struck a responsive chord in Western European and Russian public

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Sharon Weinblum

security practices, and the protection of its regime boundaries. In terms of regime boundaries, the ‘ascent’ ( aliyah ) of Jews from the diaspora to ‘Eretz Israel’ (the land of Israel) was at the core of the Zionist project according to which ‘similar progression of immigration and colonization was the precondition for the coming into existence of the State of Israel in 1948’ (Shafir 1984 : 803). The Law

in Security/ Mobility
Between humanitarianism and pragmatism
Alexis Heraclides
and
Ada Dialla

minimum proposal. The first suggested the creation of a large independent Bulgaria with an extended outlet to the Aegean Sea, including Salonica (where a large segment of the population were Sephardic Jews) as well as major gains for Serbia, Montenegro and Greece. The minimum plan was accepted, which limited the gains to Montenegro and the Bulgarians (the climate was not favourable to Serbia). Independence for Bulgaria, including Salonica, were not accepted, but a large

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
French denaturalisation law on the brink of World War II
Marie Beauchamps

–32. Marrus, M. R. and R. O. Paxton, 1995. Vichy France and the Jews , Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Simonin, A., 2008. Le Déshonneur dans la République: Une histoire de l’Indignité 1791–1958 [Dishonor in the Republic: A History of Indignity 1791–1958] , Paris: Grasset. Tuman, J. S., 2010. Communicating Terror: The Rhetorical Dimensions of Terrorism

in Security/ Mobility
Alexis Heraclides
and
Ada Dialla

against the general will in our fatherland’. 160 He called for intervention on behalf of all ‘Ottoman nations’ (including the Ottoman Greeks, the Ottoman Armenians and the Ottoman Jews). 161 When the question was put to him whether the intervention was to be military, Sabahaddin’s response was ‘How many times have [the great powers] intervened in our domestic affairs, how many times even have parts of our country been taken away? Why do we not want to

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century