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Adrian Millar

conflict. It is precisely because Lacanian theory places aggression and rivalry at the heart of human relations that it offers important insights into the management of conflict. However, far from presenting a dark view of humankind, it offers hope, if not happiness. Lacanian analysis explains why domination and dependence are part of identity construction and demonstrates how bringing the unconscious

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
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Pathologising security through Lacanian desire
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

resolution. This is what follows from the ‘splitness’ of subjectivity. Our splitness in the world drives a quest for an impossible state of unity. As Jeanne Schroeder neatly explains, ‘it is easy to presume that the reason we feel lacking is that we lack some thing ’ ( 2003 ). Desire, in Lacanian theory, revolves around a fantasy about a ‘thing’ that will resolve the lack. The

in Death and security
Adrian Millar

. (Robert Young, ‘What does psychoanalysis have to offer to newly democratising countries?’ www.human-nature.com ). Psychoanalytic works on politics include writings by Žižek, Stavrakakis, Althusser, Elliott and Jameson, as well as seminal work by Adorno and Marcuse, and adaptations of Lacanian theory by Laclau and Mouffe. 2

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
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Adrian Millar

intra-community contact would need to be encouraged and developed. Perhaps school-based programmes for change would need to be developed based on results of the research. People need to become more aware of their rationalisations. Differences that are oppositional can only be desensitised in this way. Through further academic research, further exploration of Lacanian theory, specialised training of small

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
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Adrian Millar

. Lederach notes that ‘[c]onflict is born in the world of human meaning and perception’, 16 which tells us that language has everything to do with conflict and that Lacanian theory, which views the unconscious as being structured like language, can help us deal with this. Participants to a conflict must do more than analyse the situation or try to understand the other. Francis Diane

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
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Adrian Millar

themselves in Northern Ireland. However, her analysis of Northern Protestant identity presented in the epilogue shows once again the weakness of the journalistic approach that relies heavily on psychology. Below, I examine the author’s analysis of Protestant identity, give examples of the major themes of the Protestant self-interpretation, and, finally, demonstrate how the application of Lacanian theory would

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Adrian Millar

Lacanian theory on the construction of identity. The present research differs radically from the work of McGarry and O’Leary. The latter assume that the two communities in Northern Ireland work out of their historical worldview in a predictable and coherent way whereas it is my belief that an agreed interpretation of the Northern Ireland conflict, let alone the validity of this worldview, is not something

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict