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large crowds. Duke was highly agitated, as William Murphy notes, and warned the Cabinet that the Irish situation was critical. On the basis of the chief secretary’s advice, the regulations enacting DORA were amended on 20 April to allow interment if individuals acted ‘in a manner prejudicial to the public safety of the realm’.22 On 5 May 1918, the government replaced Chief Secretary Duke and Lord Lieutenant Lord Wimborne with an Irish executive who more fully supported their intent to enforce conscription. They wanted a team who would play hard ball with the anti

in Stacking the coffins

, than with the limited nature of provision per se. The events at the Dublin house of industry during the first decades of the nineteenth century served to reinforce the perception that there was an urgent need for lunatic asylums in Ireland. As in other houses of industry, several lunatic wards had been attached to the original institution. In 1810, the governors were provided with a grant to establish a separate hospital for lunatics, subsequently named the Richmond Lunatic Asylum after Charles Gordon Lennox, the Duke of Richmond, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, who had

in Negotiating insanity in the southeast of Ireland, 1820–1900

on the proposed new asylums until 1849.40 These tensions were played out during the revision of asylum provision in the Carlow district. In spite of the general agreement with the decision to separate county Kildare from the Carlow asylum district, in July 1846 a local committee representing the interests of Kilkenny city and county, with Charles Vignoles as chairman, forwarded a petition containing an assessment of asylum provision in that county, to the Lord Lieutenant.41 The petition argued that the existing institutional facilities – the lunatic wards attached

in Negotiating insanity in the southeast of Ireland, 1820–1900

expansion programme had not provided enough accommodation and, as discussed above, Hatchell’s appointment as White’s replacement 169-194 Chapter 6.indd 184 20/07/2012 09:32 Workhouses and the mentally ill 185 on the lunacy inspectorate resulted in a shift in attitude. In their 1862 report, the lunacy inspectors argued that chronic patients did not require specialist accommodation in asylums. Supervision of tranquil patients could be successfully carried out in any institution. They suggested that the Lord Lieutenant nominate two or three workhouses in each county for

in Negotiating insanity in the southeast of Ireland, 1820–1900

House of Lords Select Committee.65 Relatives of those confined as dangerous lunatics were also uneasy; in 1853, Edward F., a thirty-three year-old labourer, was committed as a dangerous lunatic to Wexford gaol after an assault on a relative and an attempt to hang himself. While he was confined his mother sent a memorial to the Lord Lieutenant requesting that his transfer to the asylum be expedited.66 Similarly, in 1867 the father of James C., who was confined in Athy gaol in county Kildare, petitioned for his transfer to Carlow asylum or Waterford asylum.67 Families

in Negotiating insanity in the southeast of Ireland, 1820–1900
Abstract only

suitable buildings for use as lunatic asylums from 1817, the Board rejected the reuse of the recently closed Roscommon Gaol, recommended to them by Undersecretary to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Robert Peel, as a suitable building for reuse as an asylum. The Board rejected the gaol on the recommendation of architect Johnston (National Archives of Ireland Commissioners for General Control: OPW 999/784, December 1817). In Johnston’s plans for provincial asylums, submitted later that year, his sense of the ideal symmetry of an asylum was indicated by his addition of

in An archaeology of lunacy

administered the Poor Law at a local level and the Local Government Board for Ireland, and between nationalists and the Dublin Castle administration. In a curious coincidence of history, the pandemic in Ireland ran parallel with the so-​called ‘German’ plot (Chapter 8). This was a scheme devised by the administration to intern leading anti-​conscription campaigners, as the administration, which was led by newly appointed Lord Lieutenant Sir John French, sought to impose conscription in Ireland in 1918. It became part of the Sinn Féin propaganda machine, as it killed two of

in Stacking the coffins
Abstract only

. As well as the ideas behind the management of patients, the ideal asylum designs and specifications were not always adopted, or even advocated, by those involved in individual asylum design. For example, the Board of General Control in Ireland – who were responsible for the planning of provincial asylums in Ireland in 1817 – found themselves at odds with the government in Ireland, despite the government’s interest in establishing improved institutions for public confinement and welfare. The undersecretary to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland at the time was Robert

in An archaeology of lunacy

certificate attesting to the patient’s ‘recovery’. This was then submitted to the Lord Lieutenant to secure a warrant allowing for legal release. In 1845 this was altered. From that date, it was no longer required that a patient be attested ‘recovered’ but simply no longer dangerous.85 From 1846, dangerous lunatics, who were not criminal lunatics under the act, could be discharged without the Lord Lieutenant’s warrant. They were to be treated and discharged ‘as in the case of other Lunatic Poor.’86 The 1843 privy council rules provided the framework that regulated the

in Negotiating insanity in the southeast of Ireland, 1820–1900
The Irish perspective

vulnerable patients would take place. See P. Prior and D. Griffiths, ‘The chaplaincy question: The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland versus the Belfast Lunatic Asylum’, Eire-Ireland 33:2/3 (1997), 137–53. 55 CDLA, case note, number 3902, 12 April 1900. ‘He often assaults [the nurses] owing to the force of his delusions.’ 56 CDLA, case note, number 3849, 25 September 1888. ‘He says Nurse N__ “bewitched” him and that is why he did it.’ 57 CDLA, case note, number 1964, 1 April 1891. ‘The nurses complain of his constant masturbation and habit of lunging towards them without

in Mental health nursing