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in 1577. In late 1579, when Sir Henry realized that he would not be appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland with Philip as his Deputy, it would be plausible that he recommended Spenser to Grey. This scenario may not have enough external evidence to be entirely persuasive, but it is not implausible. Some biographical issues can be clarified if we recognize that we are dealing not with a dichotomy between fact and fiction but with a continuum extending from the

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
Spenser, Sidney, and the early modern chivalric code

's perceptions of Ireland, we need to keep in mind that throughout 1579 and possibly even into very early 1580, Henry Sidney thought that he might once again be sent to Ireland as Lord Deputy, or, more agreeably, Lord Lieutenant, the title that his brother-in-law, Thomas Ratcliffe, Earl of Sussex, had enjoyed and that would later be conferred on Essex. Moreover, Sir Henry had stipulated that he would be accompanied by his son Philip, who would be

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
The role of Dublin in James Yonge’s Memoriale (1412)

reading practices (Notre Dame, IN, 2013). GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 17 20/04/2017 15:33 Theresa O’Byrne 18 translation of Giraldus Cambrensis’s Expugnatio Hibernica and Latin copies of both his Expugnatio Hibernica and his Topographia Hibernica.4 In 1422, Yonge finished a translation of the Secreta secretorum, a popular mirror for princes, under the patronage of James Butler, fourth earl of Ormond, who was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland when he commissioned the work. Titled The gouernaunce of prynces, Yonge’s work presented to its Dublin audience advice on

in Dublin

subscribed with their hands’, 1562, TNA: PRO, SP 63/5/51, printed in Crawford, Anglicising the government of Ireland, appendix 2, pp. 432–8; John Parker, ‘A slanderous book addressed to the Queen against the Lord Lieutenant Sussex’, 1562, TNA: PRO, SP 63/6/37. GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 80 20/04/2017 15:33 Complaint and reform in late Elizabethan Dublin 81 of non-compliance amongst senior officials, many of whom refused to turn over records and muster books for inspection. Arnold dispatched his most expansive account of Irish affairs to Dudley and Cecil in

in Dublin
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Comus – why is he a villain? How happy is the happy ending? I begin with the question of the masque’s subject. It is usually claimed that the work was composed to celebrate the Earl of Bridgewater’s installation as President of the Council and Lord Lieutenant of Wales, but a look at both the relevant dates and the text itself make it obvious that

in Spectacular Performances
The abortive Northern Rebellion of 1663

post of Lord Lieutenant. The latter position enabled him not only to press religious uniformity, but to use his civil power to encourage informers, use the local militia and play upon the loyalties of the local gentry (particularly those with recent dubious pasts) to reassert the Church’s authority. The early Baptist movement in the North-​East of the 1650s was located in Newcastle, where it was nurtured by the presence of both an army garrison and the benevolent government of Robert Lilburne and Colonel Paul Hobson, who had served under Sir Arthur Hesilrige in the

in From Republic to Restoration

2 Books, politics and society in Renaissance Dublin Raymond Gillespie On 27 July 1662 James Butler, scion of one of the most prominent AngloIrish families and the newly created first duke of Ormond, arrived in Dublin to take up his post of lord lieutenant of Ireland. Describing that event in 1952, the architectural historian Maurice Craig used what must be one of the most striking phrases in the historical writing about ­seventeenth-century Ireland: ‘The Renaissance, in a word, had arrived in Ireland.’1 In one sense Craig was right. It was only in the late

in Dublin
The scholarly achievements of Sir James Ware

St James, Dublin, p. 216; Gillespie (ed.), The vestry records of the parish of St John the Evangelist, Dublin, p. 27. Ware’s brother-in-law was Humphrey MacRannel (Reynolds) of Lough Scur near Carrick-on-Shannon: Michael Herity, ‘Rathmulcah, Ware and MacFirbisigh’, Ulster Journal of Archaeology 33 (1970), p. 50. In a letter to Sir George Lane in 1664, Ware requested that his nephew, James Reynolds, be fully restored to his lands in the pending Bill of Settlement. In a second letter to James, Duke of Ormond, he informed the lord lieutenant that Reynolds had been in

in Dublin
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Writing for the stage in Restoration Dublin

the title page of the play presents the text ‘As it was several times Acted with great Applause before his Grace the Duke of Ormond the 52 Aidan Clarke, The Old English in Ireland (Dublin, 2000), p. 234. 53 Act IV, Scene 3. 54 Act V, Scene 2. 55 Patrick Tuite, Theatre of crisis: The performance of power in the Kingdom of Ireland, 1662–92 (Selinsgrove, 2010), p. 101. GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 220 20/04/2017 15:33 Writing for the stage in Restoration Dublin 221 Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, at the Theatre Royal in Dublin’.56 The subject of the work

in Dublin

at least 1580 as the Earl of Leicester’s Men. 17 In June 1559, Leicester sought permission from the Earl of Shrewsbury, Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire, for the company to play in the north, calling them his ‘servauntes’ and ‘plaiers of interludes’, and describing them as ‘honest men … whereof some of them have bene herde here alredie before divers of my Lordis’. 18 This suggests

in Essex