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Burying the victims of Europe’s border in a Tunisian coastal town
Valentina Zagaria

The Mediterranean Sea has recently become the deadliest of borders for illegalised travellers. The victims of the European Union’s liquid border are also found near North African shores. The question of how and where to bury these unknown persons has recently come to the fore in Zarzis, a coastal town in south-east Tunisia. Everyone involved in these burials – the coastguards, doctors, Red Crescent volunteers, municipality employees – agree that what they are doing is ‘wrong’. It is neither dignified nor respectful to the dead, as the land used as a cemetery is an old waste dump, and customary attitudes towards the dead are difficult to realise. This article will first trace how this situation developed, despite the psychological discomfort of all those affected. It will then explore how the work of care and dignity emerges within this institutional chain, and what this may tell us about what constitutes the concept of the human.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski and Svenja Mintert

99 and The Unity 01 at Borussia Dortmund, Commando Canstatt 1997 at VfB Stuttgart and Ultras Nürnberg 1994. Invented traditions need a formation date and these are memorialised on banners, flags and clothing. The spread across the Mediterranean The geographical location of Italy ensured that the ultras style of fandom was more readily accessible than the English style in Southern Europe. As the English style spread into Northern France, the Netherlands and Germany, and then into Central Europe and Poland, fans across Southern Europe began following the Italian

in Ultras
Open Access (free)
Deaths at sea and unidentified bodies in Lesbos
Iosif Kovras and Simon Robins

over borders and citizenship. Incidents of migrants and refugees dying in their efforts to cross the Aegean border and enter Greece and the EU have become a tragic consequence of contemporary EU border policy, as they have in many other parts of the Mediterranean. In October 2013 a shipwreck of unprecedented magnitude near the Italian island of Lampedusa left approximately 364 immigrants dead (Shenker 2013). Deadly incidents have also taken place in the Spanish coastal enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla, where migrants and refugees try to reach the EU border (Morcillo

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Crossing borders, changing times
Madeleine Hurd, Hastings Donnan and Carolin Leutloff-Grandits

have already endured precarious crossings of the Mediterranean to reach European shores and ultimately the destinations in Germany, Sweden or Britain that seem to promise them a future, are trapped at borders in Macedonia, Hungary, Croatia and Slovenia where newly constructed fences impede their progress. The fact that citizens of states like Kosovo, Albania, Macedonia and Serbia may themselves be among those who strive to leave, given the difficult conditions they face at home, does not seem to have tempered these new border-crossing policies of foreclosure. Migrant

in Migrating borders and moving times
Zaira Lofranco

’, Public Culture, 10(2): 225–247. Appadurai, A. (2006) Fear of Small Numbers. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Ballinger, P. (2003) History in Exile: Memory and Identity at the Borders of the Balkans. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Barth, F. (1969) Ethnic Groups and Boundaries. Boston: Little, Brown. Baškar, B. (2012) ‘Komšiluk and taking care of the neighbours’ shrine in Bosnia– Herzegovina’, in D. Albera and M. Couroucli (eds), Sharing Sacred Space in the Mediterranean. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, pp. 51–68. Brandtstädter, S. (2007

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland
Jelena Tošić

Bojan Baskar and Borut Brumen (eds), Mediterranean Ethnological Summer School, Piran/Pirano Slovenia 1996, MESS vol. II. Ljubljana, pp. 99–129. Gingrich, Andre and Richard G. Fox (2002) ‘Introduction’, in Andre Gingrich and Richard G. Fox (eds), Anthropology, by Comparison. London: Routledge, pp. 1–24. Green, S.F. (2009) Lines, Traces and Tidemarks: Reflections on Forms of Borderli-ness, COST Action IS0803 Working Paper 1. www.eastbordnet.org/working_papers/open/ documents/Green_Lines_Traces_and_Tidemarks_090414.pdf. Accessed 9 August 2016. Heiss, Johann and Martin

in Migrating borders and moving times
Alexander Korb

the summer of 1941 in which the Ustaša interned and murdered Serbian and Jewish prisoners. One of these camps was located on the Mediterranean island of Pag and another close to a hamlet called Jadovno in the coastal mountains. In neither camp had any buildings, such as crematoria, been constructed. Here, the question is whether we can demonstrate that the Ustaša planned the mass murder in advance, or whether it was not, rather, mounting brutality which led to the security guards ­massacring a large number of the prisoners. Another question in this respect is

in Human remains and mass violence
Abstract only
Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski and Svenja Mintert

to facilitate division on national or ethnic lines. Occasionally, this leads to violence, racism and abuse. For others DOIDGE__9780719027624_Print.indd 14 08/01/2020 10:19 Introduction 15 it encourages cross-cultural exchange. The ‘English disease’ of hooliganism influenced masculine fan groups across Europe in the 1980s (Giulianotti, 1999; Spaaij, 2006; Tsoukala, 2009). Since the 1990s, the ultras style of fandom has spread from Italy across the Mediterranean and is now the dominant form of fandom in Europe and globally in general. Significantly, both

in Ultras
Abstract only
Mona Abaza

beach house in the Hamptons (Davis and Monk 2007: 13), so one should remain optimistic. Guweida begins his article by commenting on the circulating news that some villas in the exclusive resorts of the North Coast of the Mediterranean have recently been purchased for the astronomical price of 110 million Egyptian pounds (L.E.) (roughly US$6 million, at the September 2018 exchange rate), while the cheapest variety within the same compound were sold for 37 million L.E. (roughly US$2 million). In dismay, Guweida laments the fact that almost all of these villas, used for

in Cairo collages
Abstract only
Al-‘imaara (the building) as topos
Mona Abaza

. Although they cannot annihilate the histories of the major cities like Alexandria, Mansura, and Cairo, they do nothing to stop the organised mafias who have got hold of large amounts of real estate and monopolise the construction sector. In Alexandria, for instance, and all along the Mediterranean coast, no one is concerned about the aesthetics of the ugly, crowded, nightmarish towers. Instead, the worry is that these towers have started to collapse like houses of cards, and thousands may die under the rubble in the decades to come. Indeed, it needs little intelligence

in Cairo collages