An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

Introduction London, 10 September 2018 Since 2015, more than one and a half million people have traversed the Mediterranean, seeking asylum in Europe. The EU has been negotiating their screening and resettlement outside of Europe. European governments have closed some ports and borders to them. And neofascist groups from across Europe have rallied on the ground and online to prevent their entry. Thousands have died at sea. Multinational NGOs like Médecins Sans Frontières and Save the Children have carried out search-and-rescue missions. But it is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Burying the victims of Europe’s border in a Tunisian coastal town
Valentina Zagaria

The Mediterranean Sea has recently become the deadliest of borders for illegalised travellers. The victims of the European Union’s liquid border are also found near North African shores. The question of how and where to bury these unknown persons has recently come to the fore in Zarzis, a coastal town in south-east Tunisia. Everyone involved in these burials – the coastguards, doctors, Red Crescent volunteers, municipality employees – agree that what they are doing is ‘wrong’. It is neither dignified nor respectful to the dead, as the land used as a cemetery is an old waste dump, and customary attitudes towards the dead are difficult to realise. This article will first trace how this situation developed, despite the psychological discomfort of all those affected. It will then explore how the work of care and dignity emerges within this institutional chain, and what this may tell us about what constitutes the concept of the human.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
David Rieff

is not in Sri Lanka, or even Syria or Afghanistan, but in the NGO response to the migration crisis in Greece and in the Mediterranean. For here, whether they like it or not, when they rescue people at sea who are trying to get to Europe, relief NGOs are involved not just in caritative work, whose deontology is relatively straightforward ethically; here, they are important actors in a profound political struggle, whose outcome, along with the response or non-response to climate change, is likely to define the next half century. It is a commonplace to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, on the impact on Palestinian refugees of US budget cuts under Donald Trump; José Luis Fiori, on the new security strategy of the US and the disavowal of liberal internationalism; David Rieff, on the legitimacy of humanitarian agencies in a changing political landscape; Mel Bunce, on humanitarian communications and ‘fake news’; Celso Amorim, on transformations in global governance and the influence of Southern states; Caroline Abu Sa’Da, on search and rescue operations in the Mediterranean; and Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa, on

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

SouthSudanNation.com, stated that a general was planning to ‘massacre Equatorians’. The story spread through WhatsApp, YouTube and Facebook as well as offline networks, and was used ‘to mobilize others to take up arms to counter the “attack”’ ( Reeves, 2017 ; see also Lynch, 2017 ). Finally, false news has made it more difficult for relief organisations to operate. Organisations working with migrants in the Mediterranean, for example, have been targeted in fake-news attacks ( Magee, 2018 ). Sean Ryan, Director of Media at Save the Children, describes

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Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

’ ( Hartley, 2016 ) and the proposal to reclaim a ‘refugee island’ from the Mediterranean Sea ( Taylor, 2016 ). These designs have been widely circulated through social media and promoted by architectural newsletters, such as Dezeen and Arch-Daily , with large events such as the 2016 Venice Biennale adding a range of even more ambitious designs to the mix (see also Aquilino, 2011 ; Charlesworth, 2014 ; Meinhold, 2013 ; Sinclair and Stohr, 2006 ). Faced by this stream of ideas and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Christopher T. Marsden

‘Regulators’ regulators’ forum in Barcelona on 2–3 July 2015, when no less than ten national regulators explained their approaches to net neutrality. 13 BEREC met with EaPeReg (Eastern Partnership Electronic Communications Regulators Network), REGULATEL (Latin American Forum of Telecommunications Regulators) and EMERG (Euro-Mediterranean Regulators Group) for the high-level Regulator Summit, representing

in Network neutrality
Leslie C. Green

maintained an effective blockade not only in the Gulf itself but also in the eastern Mediterranean, effectively stopping for visit-and-search vessels believed to be heading for Iraq. As has been pointed out, much of the law concerning maritime warfare, particularly as regards the actions of belligerents towards merchant shipping, stems from the provisions

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Leslie C. Green

appreciate how either Yugoslavia or Afghanistan could be considered a North Atlantic power or as threatening such a power. It is only by arguing that peace in the Balkans, particularly when threatened by terrorists as the Kosovans were originally described, automatically threatens the Mediterranean and all the surrounding countries, many of which fall within the geographic area to which the Treaty applies

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Christopher T. Marsden

. 92 Ibid. , Section 12, p. 24. 93 EaPeReg (Eastern Partnership Electronic Communications Regulators Network), REGULATEL (Latin American Forum of Telecommunications Regulators) and EMERG (Euro-Mediterranean Regulators Group). See EaPeReg ( 2015 ) detailing the 38 NRAs present from the EU, EFTA, East of

in Network neutrality