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Catherine Baker

interwar struggles over South Slav ethnopolitical identities had been framed around race by adapting German scientific racism (Bartulin 2013, 2014 ). 7 Hans Günther's six physically distinguishable European racial subgroups had included a ‘Dinaric’ race (alongside Nordic, Mediterranean, Alpine, East Baltic and Phalian) on which definitions of Yugoslav and single-nation identities would draw (Bartulin 2009 : 199–213). 8 The NDH defined its ideal Croat as a ‘Nordic–Dinaric’ racial type, tall, fair-haired warrior heroes from the Croatian

in Race and the Yugoslav region
David Miller

consumers have a bit less disposable income and decide to cut back on Mediterranean holidays. This, obviously, has an impact on the livelihoods of the island-dwellers for whom tourism is the main source of income. Perhaps the marginal beach-bar owner will be forced out of business. Should he or she have a voice in the Chancellor's decision? Is the Chancellor even required to justify his decision to the bar owner? I take the answers to these

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Entanglements and ambiguities
Saurabh Dube

’s manner of being in the world, namely, narrative.” 66 It is equally worth reflecting on how Braudel’s seminal writings have not only rendered entire regions of the Mediterranean world as islands floating outside the currents of civilization and history, but further cast as ahistorical the sphere of everyday “material culture,” especially when compared with the historical dynamism of early modern

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Catherine Baker

’, a tacit agreement among whites not to know of racialised Others' suffering, involves not just creating and legitimising systemic inequality between differently racialised groups but also the boundaries of whiteness and non-whiteness altering to tend towards (without predetermining) the ‘limited expansion’ of whiteness over time: this, for what Mills ( 1997 : 78–9) calls ‘ “borderline” Europeans, white people with a question mark’, including ‘the Irish, Slavs, Mediterraneans, and above all … Jews’, is the ambiguity of racialisation in northern European and settler

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Abstract only
Once more, with feeling
Simon Mussell

the United States. In response, Barack Obama stated:  ‘I know the events of the past few days have prompted strong passions, but as details unfold I urge everyone … to remember this young man through reflection and understanding.’ In a similar vein, in October 2015, David Cameron described how best to respond to the ongoing refugee crisis, drawing particular attention to the widely publicized photograph of Alan Kurdi, a three-​ year-​old boy from Syria who had drowned in the Mediterranean Sea. Cameron said: ‘Like most people, I found it almost impossible to get the

in Critical theory and feeling
Catherine Baker

frameworks of governance and profiling. The Yugoslav region, covering much of the ‘Balkan route’ along which undocumented migrants travelling overland via Greece entered the EU (the alternative to the maritime ‘Mediterranean route’ between North Africa and Italy/Spain), thus took up yet another of its liminal geopolitical positions. 19 The Schengen immediate exterior made first Slovenia, then Croatia, and eventually every ex-Yugoslav state including Kosovo a last line of ‘defence’ against overland migrants

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Catherine Baker

dependants), most from economically disadvantaged agricultural regions like the Dalmatian hinterland, Herzegovina and Macedonia, became ‘Gastarbeiters’ (supposedly temporary labour migrants) in north-west European states filling labour shortages from the Northern and Southern Mediterranean (Daniel 2007 : 280). 14 The history of race in West Germany, which hosted the most Yugoslav guest-workers, therefore includes how authorities racialised Croats, Roma and other ‘Yugoslavs’ compared with the even larger Turkish and Kurdish

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

travelled through and settled in the region, among them Africans enslaved under the Eastern Mediterranean slave trade, African students who travelled to Yugoslav universities and Chinese merchants traversing postsocialist Europe; south-east European states' and individuals' global entanglements, especially at world-historical moments such as the Cold War or the present refugee crisis; the adjustments migrants from south-east Europe make to their new home countries' racial formations and how they themselves are, often ambiguously, racialised there; and the racial

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Rainer Bauböck

substance and also some revisions to my discussion of AAI. Let me first concede that ex post justification of decisions towards externally affected interests is always necessary and often sufficient. Although Miller is likely to disagree, I think this can be said even of his Mediterranean beach-bar owner affected by the British Chancellor's decision to raise consumption tax to finance British health care with the unintended effect

in Democratic inclusion