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Author:

This is the first book-length study of one of the most significant of all British television writers, Jimmy McGovern. The book provides comprehensive coverage of all his work for television including early writing on Brookside, major documentary dramas such as Hillsborough and Sunday and more recent series such as The Street and Accused.

Whilst the book is firmly focused on McGovern’s own work, the range of his output over the period in which he has been working also provides something of an overview of the radical changes in television drama commissioning that have taken place during this time. Without compromising his deeply-held convictions McGovern has managed to adapt to an ever changing environment, often using his position as a sought-after writer to defy industry trends.

The book also challenges the notion of McGovern as an uncomplicated social realist in stylistic terms. Looking particularly at his later work, a case is made for McGovern employing a greater range of narrative approaches, albeit subtly and within boundaries that allow him to continue to write for large popular audiences.

Finally it is worth pointing to the book’s examination of McGovern’s role in recent years as a mentor to new voices, frequently acting as a creative producer on series that he part-writes and part brings through different less-experienced names.

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Radio Londra between myth and reality
Ester Lo Biundo

British station only distanced itself from the fascist regime when Italy declared war on France and Britain. While in the 1930s the BBC Arabic Service was attacking fascist Radio Bari in the Middle East and North Africa, the BBC Home Service and the EIAR exchanged material, artists and advice. Other sources have, however, shown another side of the relationship between the corporation and the Italians. In Chapter 3 we have seen that the BBC was regarded by many of its Italian employees as a second home. The memoirs of Paolo

in London calling Italy
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Borderlands and interfaces
Michael Gott

man a visa that affords him access to fly to (in first class, no less) and live in Europe, thus avoiding the perilous trek undertaken by so many of his compatriots and many others in the Middle East and beyond. But he toils under the regimes of surveillance and economic logic that his body is subjected to as a living work of art and art commodity. By having his back tattooed by a star of the

in Screen borders
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Ester Lo Biundo

The years in which each foreign service was established provide some evidence of the connection between the BBC and British international politics. The first news bulletins and programmes in a foreign language were broadcast in the Middle East. This is not a coincidence, considering that fascist radio propaganda was already operating in the area. Fascist programmes were trying to build an image of Mussolini as a protector of Islam. 49 On the request of the Foreign Office, the BBC started broadcasting in Arabic, since

in London calling Italy
John Corner

Middle East that are not empowered. And these people have power. These are beautiful, sexy looking people that look like they have some spending power. And these people represent a dynamic in a very important part of the Middle East. (‘Jonathan Klein interviews Getty Photographer Spencer Platt’, posted 22 July 2007, www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQQIp2PEr-s) In a development that is not too surprising, given the level of international media interest, the people in the car were found and interviewed by the press (German and Belgian journalists were involved initially, with

in Theorising Media
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Ente Italiano per le Audizioni Radiofoniche (EIAR)
Ester Lo Biundo

of war on France and Great Britain in June 1940. 25 As Manuela Williams has written, the early 1930s opened a new phase of aggressive policy in the Middle East: The rise of the threat of an expansionist Germany opened the way for Mussolini to play an initial role of balance between major power blocs. At the same time, the growing popular consent generated by both Arab nationalism and Zionism attracted the attention of the Fascist regime

in London calling Italy
Migrants and the Mediterranean in Italian–French co-productions
Michael Gott

identifying documents as they are transferred to a larger boat to complete the crossing into the EU. Before they reach their intended destination they will be confronted by a Greek patrol boat and many will dive into the water. Greece has served as one of the primary points of entry to Europe for migrants and refugees from the Middle East, and Costa-Gavras’s film narrates a commonplace trajectory well before

in Screen borders
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Michael Gott

–2008 economic crisis engendered no small amount of apprehension focused on the often vaguely ascribed culprit of ‘globalisation’. In 2015 refugees fleeing civil war in Syria elevated what had been an ongoing but more modest flow of migrants and refugees heading for Europe from the Middle East, Central Asia, and Africa to the status of political and media ‘crisis’ that took on its own logic beyond the human

in Screen borders
Tom Stoppard’s The Dog It Was That Died
Jonathan Bolton

hashish, a habit he had picked up as a colonial administrator in the Middle East. In one scene, he holds a top-level meeting in the opium den in his home, and one can hear his hookah burbling in the background. When he is not getting stoned, the Chief is busy conducting an illicit affair with Blair's wife. As second in command, Blair appears to be slightly more competent but less interested in overseeing the agency's operations. Despite the laxity that prevails at Q6, they are quick to act when their autonomy is threatened. When Purvis's attempted

in The Blunt Affair
Jonathan Bolton

Soviet defector who was shot in Turkey while awaiting clearance from MI5 for British naturalization. Volkov had worked in Soviet intelligence in the Middle East and claimed to know the names of several British agents in the region, including two traitors, most likely Philby and Burgess, working at the Foreign Office. Philby managed to gain supervision over Volkov's defection and, as Philby's biographer Anthony Cove Brown describes it, his “unhurried handling of the affair” left Volkov languishing in Turkey for three weeks, leaving ample time for Soviet agents to locate

in The Blunt Affair