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What rough beast?
Series: Irish Society

This book explores the issue of a collective representation of Ireland after the sudden death of the 'Celtic Tiger' and introduces the aesthetic idea that runs throughout. The focus is on the idea articulated by W. B. Yeats in his famous poem 'The Second Coming'. The book also explores the symbolic order and imaginative structure, the meanings and values associated with house and home, the haunted houses of Ireland's 'ghost estates' and the fiscal and moral foundations of the collective household. It examines the sophisticated financial instruments derived from mortgage-backed securities that were a lynchpin of global financialization and the epicentre of the crash, the question of the fiscal and moral foundations of the collective household of Europe. A story about fundamental values and principles of fairness and justice is discussed, in particular, the contemporary conflict that reiterates the ancient Irish mythic story of the Tain. The book suggests correspondences between Plato's Republic and the Irish republic in the deformations and devolution of democracy into tyranny. It traces a red thread from the predicament of the ancient Athenians to contemporary Ireland in terms of the need to govern pleonexia, appetites without limits. The political and economic policies and practices of Irish development, the designation of Ireland's 'tax free zones', are also discussed. Finally, the ideal type of person who has been emerging under the auspices of the neoliberal revolution is imagined.

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Jonathan Glover

3 On moral nose Jonathan Glover John Harris on olfactory moral philosophy In several of his writings, including his On Cloning, John Harris argues against basing policies on what George Orwell called ‘moral nose’. He says that Orwell used this phrase ‘as if one could simply sniff a situation and detect wickedness’.1 He gives examples of this approach in debate on bioethical issues. One is Mary Warnock’s claim that the existence of morality requires ‘some barriers which should not be passed’ and her thought that often these barriers are marked by ‘a sense of

in From reason to practice in bioethics
Torbjörn Tännsjö

6 Moral epistemology and the survival lottery Torbjörn Tännsjö Introduction It has become commonplace in epistemology to distinguish between ‘foundationalism’ and ‘coherentism’. According to foundationalism, a person, S, at a time t, is justified in the belief that p, if, and only if, p is itself self-evident for S at t, or, it is self-evident to S at t that p is derivable from propositions that are self-evident for S at t. All the propositions that are self-evident for a person at a time constitute an epistemic foundation for this person at this time. And all

in From reason to practice in bioethics
Harry Lesser

8 The natural as a moral category Harry Lesser The purposes of nature John Harris has devoted his professional life to the application of reason to ethics. It is therefore appropriate in this Festschrift (to which it is an honour to contribute) to consider which kinds of appeal in moral matters are rational and which are not. One kind of appeal that has been very common, both in everyday life and in several philosophical traditions, is the appeal to what is natural. But there are grounds for maintaining that, despite the prevalence of arguments that a practice

in From reason to practice in bioethics
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

chemical composition of unrefined natural gas, the blast radius of pipeline rupture at pressures over 300 bar, price per barrel projections on global markets post-peak oil and the legalities of compulsory purchase orders, what had been initially formulated as ‘beyond belief’ is, by another speaker, rearticulated as familiar, mundane and all too real – at least in terms of the experiences of this community, for whom generations of migration between 70 MORAL ECONOMY rural periphery to global metropolis and back again have made people keenly intelligent and wise to the

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
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Examining Ireland’s failure to regulate embryonic stem cell research
Ciara Staunton

10 A moral gap? Examining Ireland’s failure to regulate embryonic stem cell research Ciara Staunton Introduction Developments in human biotechnology have created new ethical concerns. Just as the early years of organ transplant technology brought about a change in our concept of death, developments in embryology are challenging our concept of what constitutes life. Progress in medical science has now made it possible not only to create an embryo in a laboratory, but to destroy that same embryo in the course of medical research. While there is great potential for

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
Patrícia Alves de Matos

specific modes of conduct and behaviour through which subjectivities are organised and disciplined in the early stages of learning the job. The processes the trainees (and later workers) go through reveal how emotions, bureaucracy and hierarchy are framed in the organisation of work. These processes disclose a moral economy of labourer production within the Portuguese call centre sector, in which operators are positioned, valued, evaluated, and envisioned as potential containers of subordination and agency. Recruitment: skills, docility and autonomy In Portugal, the

in Disciplined agency
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

formula of ‘authoritarian liberalism’ and sharpened ‘friend–enemy’ distinctions that Carl Schmitt advocated in the 1920s as an antidote to Weimar Germany’s economic depression, cultural decadence and political drift; a ‘political theology’1 that culminated in fascist totalitarianism. Ireland, the success story of neoliberal globalization, was amongst the first and worst casualties of the global depression. In the wake of the death of the 88 MORAL ECONOMY Celtic Tiger, Ireland, which led the race to the bottom away from the post-war model of Social Europe, is one of

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
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Omen of a post-republic: the demon child of neoliberalism
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

the raptor flies free, so much so that the principle of neoliberal political-economic and moral theology becomes ‘greed is good’. But this apparent vitality, seen from a different aspect, is like a cancer, proliferating, thriving, metastasizing; an aggressive and deathly form of growth, giving rise to extensive and intensive social pathologies, threatening civilization with sociocide and ecocide. And it is not just a process of de-symbolization that is taking place (de-symbolization occurs at other times of crisis and transition in the history of civilization – the

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
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Turning towards a radiant ideal
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

may be, for they are both present’. Such a considered and temperate moderation ‘is the source of all our happiness and friendship’ (1892: 14). But just as we are getting somewhere the conversation takes a regressive turn, towards an alluring image that we are still in the grip of today, namely 108 MORAL ECONOMY Aristophanes’ famous metaphor of love in terms of individuals pursuing their lost soul-mates: We are disunited halves of what was once a united whole, and we go in search of our original unity. And when one of them finds his other half . . . the pair are

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland