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political,” they “demean and … degrade moral thought.” I’m extremely relieved not to be in this class. I can’t, of course, match the intensity of Ricks’s indignation – I never could – but I do certainly share his ethical principles. My primary concern was with the historical and scholarly aspects of the subject, and I shall return to those; but since

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mortals, the fault has generally been either inadvertent or compelled − as Venus deliberately inspires lust in Atalanta and Hippomenes, and then punishes them for succumbing to it. Orpheus’s own death, at the hands of the women whom he has rejected, is in context less a moral about the unnaturalness of homosexuality than a warning about the dangers of unsatisfied women. And, more

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legislation, and the age remained statutorily unchanged until the eighteenth century. It is perhaps relevant that 1604 was also the year Othello was first performed: the issue of parental control over marriage was being actively debated at the time. Such a marriage, therefore, raised ethical and moral issues that would have had nothing to do with the fact that Othello was black. The

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characters is, to conceive any one intellectual or moral faculty in morbid excess, and then to place himself, Shakspere, thus mutilated or diseased, under given circumstances. In Hamlet he seems to have wished to exemplify the moral necessity of a due balance between our attention to the objects of our senses, and our meditation on the

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masterpieces, with a view to publishing a volume of them. One of the first that Hollar completed was a rather grisly scene from ancient history, King Seleucis Ordering his Son’s Eye to Be Put Out , after a sketch by Giulio Romano for a fresco in the Palazzo Tè ( figure 12.13 ). The subject was a moral story about the perquisites and obligations of power – the son

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