Search results

Gothic Dissent in Dennis Potter‘s Cold Lazarus
Val Scullion

This article uses Franco Moretti‘s interpretation of Frankenstein and Dracula (Signs Taken For Wonders, 1988) to interrogate Dennis Potter‘s final television play, Cold Lazarus (1996). The critical approach, following Moretti‘s example, is generic, Freudian and Marxist. By identifying the conventions of Gothic drama in Potter‘s play, it claims, firstly, that Cold Lazarus dramatizes deep-seated psychic neuroses; and secondly, alerts its viewers to contemporary cultural anxieties about individual autonomy and the exploitative nature of capitalist enterprise. The argument challenges the predominantly negative reception of Cold Lazarus when first screened in 1994 and aims to defend this play as a fine example of televisual Gothic drama.

Gothic Studies
Ed Cameron

This article argues that the allegorical interpretations of the Gothic sublime made by materialist critics like Franco Moretti and Judith Halberstam unavoidably reduce Gothic excess and uncanniness to a realist understanding and, thereby, ironically de-materialize Gothic monstrosity by substituting for it a realistic meaning. This essay, instead, advocates a psychoanalytic critical reception that demonstrates how the essential uncanniness of the Gothic novel makes all realistic interpretation falter. Rather than interpreting Frankensteins creature as a condensed figure for proletarian formation or Dracula as an allegory for xenophobia, for instance, this article insists that the Gothic uncanny should be understood as figuring that which can only be viewed figuratively, as figuring that which has no space within a realistic understanding.

Gothic Studies
Mourning and melodrama in Para que no me olvides (2005) by Patricia Ferreira
Isolina Ballesteros

– ‘If only I had made peace with him’; ‘I failed him in the end –’ and yet she is unable to shed tears, which would offer relief and would prove that she is ‘reconciled with the irreversibility of time’ (Moretti, 1983 : 180). Clara, on the other hand, is a melancholic who displays sadness before the actual physical loss of David due to her status as a rejected daughter after her mother’s death and her

in Hispanic and Lusophone women filmmakers
Abstract only
Andrew Dix

from ‘readings’ of the primary material and do something radically different is not unique to contemporary film studies. Franco Moretti – whose work on genre features in Chapter 5 – urges a similar change of direction for his own field of literary study. Instead of focusing upon ‘concrete, individual works’ ( 2005 : 1), or restricting itself to ‘separate bits of knowledge about individual cases’ (4), literary criticism in Moretti’s view should take as its proper object of inquiry ‘a collective system, that should be grasped as such, as a whole’ (4). In film studies

in Beginning film studies (second edition)
What do The Smiths mean to Manchester?
Julian Stringer

.5 In Atlas of the European Novel 1800–1900, Franco Moretti claims that ‘[p]lacing a literary phenomenon in its specific space – mapping it – is not the conclusion of geographical work; it’s the beginning’.6 Much the same may also be said of popular music. To avoid the repetition of historical narratives about The Smiths and Manchester that remain static and one-dimensional, more dynamic models of historical analysis need to be proposed. One reason for this is that the meaning of a cultural phenomenon never stays the same. The significance of a musical star image

in Why pamper life's complexities?
Abstract only
Bill Marshall

-Pierre Kalfon, as well as Michèle Moretti, with whom Téchiné was to have a long professional relation4 Rereleased in 2004. Marc’O, born in 1927 as Marc-Gilbert Guillaumin, has from the 1990s to the present been artistic director of the radical theatre group Génération Chaos and their magazine Les Périphériques vous parlent. His other films include the avant-garde 60 Minutes de la vie intérieure d’un homme/Closed Vision, presented at the 1954 Cannes Film Festival by Jean Cocteau. emergence 5 ship). André Téchiné was assistant director on this film, which was edited by Jean

in André Téchiné
Abstract only
Andrew Dix

of alternative generic mappings? One possibility is that online communities may jam the film industry’s powerful discursive machinery and generate new perspectives on the work. Genres and history The iconoclastic literary scholar Franco Moretti offers another suggestive metaphor for genres. They are, he says with reference to the Roman god of doorways, ‘Janus-like creatures, with one face turned to history and the other to form’ ( 2005 : 14). Yet even to phrase the matter like this is to introduce a false dichotomy between form and

in Beginning film studies (second edition)
Vijay Mishra

consumed literary discourses under colonialism even in America. It follows that the Gothic quickly became part of a world-literary system along the lines theorised by Franco Moretti ( 2011 ) and as such, elsewhere, outside of Europe, it entered into a compromise with local literary conventions and forms of representation. One such compromise was the Indian compromise. The question

in The Gothic and death
The popular novel in France
Diana Holmes

romances of Maryan, it is possible to draw some general conclusions about the kinds of narrative that drew large readerships. If ‘high’ literature is characterised by a self-conscious will to seek new forms, to question and reinvent the relationship between language and experience, popular literature seeks to provide reliable pleasures, both cognitive and affective, and thus observes the norms established by previous successes even as it plays new variations on existing themes and narrative chords. As Franco Moretti suggests, the history of popular literature is closer

in Imagining the popular in contemporary French culture
Abstract only
Bill Marshall

filigrane’ (‘a film we could call Marxist, in minor mode or implic- 46 andré téchiné itly’) (Jousse 1991). The model here is of course Balzac, for long held in high regard by Marxist critics for his dissection of the emerging early nineteenth-century capitalist world in the novels of the comédie humaine, and beyond that the tradition of the Bildungsroman, or novel of education. Unlike the stable communities of the traditional past, modernity requires ‘an uncertain exploration of social space’ (Moretti 1987: 4) through narratives of mobility, unexpected hopes

in André Téchiné