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Tim Robinson, culture and environment

Unfolding Irish landscapes offers a comprehensive and sustained study of the work of cartographer, landscape writer and visual artist Tim Robinson. The visual texts and multi-genre essays included in this book, from leading international scholars in Irish Studies, geography, ecology, environmental humanities, literature and visual culture, explore Robinson’s writing, map-making and art. Robinson’s work continues to garner significant attention not only in Ireland, but also in the United Kingdom, Europe and North America, particularly with the recent celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of his monumental Stones of Aran: pilgrimage. Robert Macfarlane has described Robinson’s work in Ireland as ‘one of the most sustained, intensive and imaginative studies of a landscape that has ever been carried out’. It is difficult to separate Robinson the figure from his work and the places he surveys in Ireland – they are intertextual and interconnected. This volume explores some of these characteristics for both general and expert readers alike. As individual studies, the essays in this collection demonstrate disciplinary expertise. As parts of a cohesive project, they form a collective overview of the imaginative sensibility and artistic dexterity of Robinson’s cultural and geographical achievements in Ireland. By navigating Robinson’s method of ambulation through his prose and visual creations, this book examines topics ranging from the politics of cartography and map-making as visual art forms to the cultural and environmental dimensions of writing about landscapes.

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and the tributaries flowing down into the Champlain Valley, the many plateaus, cliffs, boulder fields and vernal pools that are landmarks for hikers within Hogback’s dramatically contorted terrain go nameless on the map. Residents in this part of Vermont who are of European descent are impoverished by a general oblivion to the names and stories woven into the land over many centuries by the Western Abenaki, just as the original people’s descendants here are disenfranchised by that ignorance. In contrast to other parts of North America 47 48 John Elder where

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
The deep mapping projects of Tim Robinson’s art and writings, 1969–72

, the discursive and the sensual; the conflation of oral testimony, anthology, memoir, biography, natural history and everything you might ever want to say about a place.34 A more recent and comprehensive account of the history of deep mapping is offered by the visual artist and scholar Iain Biggs, where he notes that the term deep mapping with regards to its origins and praxis has now become associated with two distinct types of place-based practice. In North America (and in environmental circles) deep mapping usually refers to ‘an environmentally oriented 57 58

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Securing or denying minorities’ right to the city?

Environment 22 (9): 1142–​1158. Brenner, N. and Theodore, N. (Eds) (2002): Spaces of Neoliberalism: Urban Restructuring in North America and Western Europe. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers Ltd. Certomà, C., Hardman, M., Ioannou, B., Morán, N., Notteboom, B., Silvestri, G. and Sondermann, M. (2016):  Grassroots movements:  towards cooperative forms of green urban development? In:  Bell, S., Fox-​ Kamper, R., Keshavarz, N., Benson, M., Caputo, S., Noori, S. and Voigt, A. (Eds):  Urban Allotment Gardens in Europe. New York: Routledge,  62–​90. Copenhagen European Green

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
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Critically evaluating the role of the Incredible Edible movement in the UK

allotments, communal gardens and other growing spaces (Gorgolewski et al., 2011; Wiskereke and Viljoen, 2012). Proponents of UA often cite Detroit (USA) and Havana (Cuba) as exemplars in which such practices have resulted in various positive impacts:  regenerating space, feeding people in need and creating sustainable economies (Giorda, 2012). An emerging argument in Europe surrounds the potential for UA to create a more ‘just’ food system (Alkon and Agyeman, 2011). Whilst the link between food justice and UA has a nascent research base in North America, there is little

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice

support an ongoing experience of nature within the urbanised landscape. The more than a century-​long tradition of urban allotment gardens continues to be practised in many European cities (Keshavarz and Bell, 2016), though not without challenges (Eizenberg et al., 2016). At the same time, the urban allotment garden has almost completely disappeared from US cities since the middle of the twentieth century (Bassett, 1979). Nevertheless, another more contemporary The foreseen future of urban gardening form of urban gardening appeared in North American cities sometime in

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
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Renegotiating the Irish border

and the Republic of Ireland’, Irish Political Studies 11; 103–29. Tannam, E. (1999) Cross-border Cooperation in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. London: Macmillan. Timothy, D. J. and Butler, R. W. (1995) ‘Cross-border shopping: a North American perspective’, Annals of Tourism Research 22: 6–34. Tonge, J. (2005) The EU and the Irish Border: Shaping Aid and Attitudes? CIBR Electronic Working Papers Series WP05-1. Belfast: Centre for International Borders Research (CIBR), Queens University Belfast, www

in Spacing Ireland
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Spaces and spectres of Ireland after NAMA

. New York: Basic Books. Brenner, N. and Theodore, N. (eds) (2002) Spaces of Neoliberalism: Urban Restructuring in North America and Western Europe. London: Blackwell Publishing. Central Statistics Office (CSO) (2006) Quarterly National Household Survey Quarter 4 2005, www.cso.ie/releasespublications/documents/labour_market/current/ qnhsssiaq42005.pdf, accessed 20 October 2011. Central Statistics Office (CSO) (2008) Construction and Housing in Ireland, www.eirestat. cso.ie/releasespublications/documents/construction/current/constructhousing. pdf, accessed 20 October

in Spacing Ireland
Tim Robinson’s place in Irish Studies

being transgressive authors too restless, physically and psychically, to be tied to desk and quad. Tim Robinson’s place in Irish Studies The Irish Studies field is no different from others in the academic world, with attendance at conferences both a necessity and a lifeline. If a scholar decides to remain at home, he/she will be left outside of discussions, will fall behind with regard to scholarly trends and become as dated as bell-bottom trousers and puffed-up shoulder pads. In addition, particularly in North America, scholars need to attend conferences in order to

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Tim Robinson as narrative scholar

’, North American nature writer Barry Lopez writes, Perhaps a black-throated sparrow lands in a paloverde bush – the resiliency of the twig under the bird, that precise shade of yellowish-green against the milk-blue sky, the fluttering whir of the arriving sparrow, are what I mean by ‘the landscape’ … These are all elements of the land, and what makes the landscape comprehensible are the relationships between them. One learns a landscape finally not by knowing the name or identity of everything in it, but by perceiving the relationships in it  – like that between the

in Unfolding Irish landscapes