Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 100 items for :

  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
C. Lejewski
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
The problematic nature of the limited edition
K.E. Gover

the artwork destroyed was a multiple. Other, unmolested copies of the same series by Goya still exist; hence, they destroyed an instance of Goya's work, but they did not eliminate all of its instances. Aside from the ethical question of whether the Chapman brothers were justified in destroying the Goya prints, this case also raises some ontological questions: did the Chapmans

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Andrew Patrizio

related trajectories are already too large, diverse and dynamically expanding to attempt anything other than a selective exercise. It is one, though, that might suggest some of the most productive methodological and ontological routes for an ecocritical art history to come. There are many prehistories to new materialism to be found in Eastern and Western philosophies (from Lucretius, Epicurus, Spinoza and Zen Buddhism) that cannot be adequately described here but certainly form a bedrock of intellectual formations that are often drawn on by contemporary writers

in The ecological eye
Barbara Balfour

educational manuals to ostensibly critical texts, have amply covered this territory. My reflections on the what of print will entail an ontological and material consideration of what can be construed as the medium specificity of this already multiple set of media, while my contemplation of the why of print will address the possible sets of reasons behind one's adoption of

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Andrew Patrizio

’s ‘unfulfilled promises and unacknowledged brutality’ and its roots in hegemony, teleology, rationalism, Eurocentrism and violence. 5 If the foundational terms of liberal humanism have been guiding art history so far, how might we read Braidotti’s assertion that ‘[n]ot all of us can say, with any degree of certainty, that we have always been human, or that we are only that’? 6 This is ontologically disorientating and also opens up much wider possibilities of identity. Art history should engage with Braidotti’s challenge, despite or because of the fact that the nature

in The ecological eye
Andrew Patrizio

) have been among the most clearly energetic expressions of the ecological eye and it would be impossible to do justice to all their complexity and richness. What I claim, however, is that, despite their diversity, they collectively form an expression of a wider tendency towards ‘flat ontologies’. They embrace the further erosion of hierarchical structures and thought patterns, and by troubling the easy boundaries that have existed in Western thought in relation to animal representation, ethics, rituals and domestic practice they have great power and future potential

in The ecological eye
Ben O’Loughlin

drones and helicopter gunships (Holert, this volume; Christensen, this volume). This sustains a relationship between ‘the image of world politics’ and actual visual images of world politics; between metaphorical, conceptual understandings of the ontology and mechanics of international relations and the horrific news and events witnessed every day. The critical task then is not simply to come up with new theoretical images and concepts, but to get these to take hold in the public sphere, on the ‘public screen’ (cf. DeLuca and Peeples 2002) of international politics. The

in Image operations
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

From Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry to British Romantic art
Author: Hélène Ibata

The challenge of the sublime argues that the unprecedented visual inventiveness of the Romantic period in Britain could be seen as a response to theories of the sublime, more specifically to Edmund Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757). While it is widely accepted that the Enquiry contributed to shaping the thematics of terror that became fashionable in British art from the 1770s, this book contends that its influence was of even greater consequence, paradoxically because of Burke’s conviction that the visual arts were incapable of conveying the sublime. His argument that the sublime was beyond the reach of painting, because of the mimetic nature of visual representation, directly or indirectly incited visual artists to explore not just new themes, but also new compositional strategies and even new or undeveloped pictorial and graphic media, such as the panorama, book illustrations and capricci. More significantly, it began to call into question mimetic representational models, causing artists to reflect about the presentation of the unpresentable and the inadequacy of their endeavours, and thus drawing attention to the process of artistic production itself, rather than the finished artwork. By revisiting the links between eighteenth-century aesthetic theory and visual practices, The challenge of the sublime establishes new interdisciplinary connections which address researchers in the fields of art history, cultural studies and aesthetics.