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Louise Amoore

, the revival of IPE in the 1970s precisely coincided with the inability of conventional IR frameworks to ‘fully comprehend structural change’ (Gill, 1997: 7). IPE, by contrast, claims to offer a distinctive ontology, one that is attuned to social forces and social relations on a global scale, and also a distinctive epistemology that is ‘open’ to diverse insights on social transformation (Strange, 1984; 1994).1 Hence, as Robert Cox has it, IPE embodies inherent critical potential, an ability to ‘stand back’ from the apparent order of things and to consider ‘the ways

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Tuur Driesser

project, it takes a step back from that all-encompassing prison-house of language 226 (In)formalising to return some sense of ontological security to the territory. This is cartography as what Kurgan (2013: 34–36) calls a ‘para-empirical’ analysis: an ‘effort at once to reclaim a sense of reality, and not to imagine that this requires doing away with representations, narratives, and images’. Acknowledging the inherently abstracting qualities of representation, it re-evaluates the relationship of the map to the territory as one that is a representation, but a

in Time for mapping
Alireza F. Farahani and Azadeh Hadizadeh Esfahani

underlying processes driving development and, more recently, the representations of certain countries as ‘underdeveloped’ ( Escobar, 1995 , 2008 ; Jakimow, 2008 ). Little-d development relies on different accounts developed from Marxist and/or poststructuralist philosophies and hence there is a spectrum of ontologies and epistemologies underpinning these views. With dystopian perspectives on the condition of development, progress is denied or postponed until after total social transformation and/or revolution ( Jakimow, 2008 ). One can’t say which of these

in The power of pragmatism
Open Access (free)
Mapping times
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

chapters implicitly reflect on Merriman’s (2011) challenge that notions of ‘space-time’ and ‘time-space’ have frequently rested on rather static conceptions. In proposing ‘­movement-space’ as an alternative, however, Merriman remains ­inattentive 2 Time for mapping to the ontological proclivities of particular digital formations. Although he does not invoke digital mapping in his re-theorisation, and although few of our authors directly cite his work, the implications of his intervention are pertinent issues consistently and carefully addressed in this book

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Louise Amoore

universality that so often surrounds ideas about globalisation is replaced by the possibility of multiple and multi-layered conceptions, each with a distinctive epistemological and ontological commitment. It is only in the most recent phase of the globalisation debate that scholars have begun to seriously address the question of divergent conceptions of globalisation. This has tended to take the form of the development of typologies or categorisations of perspectives on globalisation. Held et al. (1999: 2–10) have developed a threefold typology of perspectives – the

in Globalisation contested
The case for practice theory
Matthew Hanchard

digital map use is connected to, and situated within, a range of complex digital-social arrangements. Practice theory: a simplified sketch As a well-established field of study, practice theory can boast an extremely diverse set of influences – from the philosophies of Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Dreyfus and Taylor (Schatzki, 2001) to Merleau-Ponty (Couldry, 2004), and on through to the social (and cultural) theories of Bourdieu (1977; 1992), de Certeau (1988), and Giddens (1984). Ontologically, the position reconciles an older structure/agency debate, holding that ‘the

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences
Thomas Sutherland

‘[d]eterritorialisation, in general, is one of the central forces of the modern world’. Deleuzian philosophy, it must be noted, has had a significant impact upon the ubiquity of this concept of flow within the social sciences and particularly human geography. In the words of Boltanski and Chiapello (2007: xxiv), what Deleuze and Guattari offer is ‘an ontology containing only one tier or plane (the ‘plane of immanence’)’, which ‘knows only singularities or flows, the relationship between which assumes a reticular form and whose movements and relations are governed by

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia
Pablo Abend

– in the example, pagan and biblical history epistemologically and graphically encloses the map’s content within a circular space around the body of Christ. The navigational, by contrast, emphasises the performative character of the mapping as an open process, and at the same time, the involvement of the spectator is thus able to challenge static and linear models of cartographic communication that are based on unified and standardised ontologies. Turnbull (2007), for example, criticises ‘Western’ mapping practices for dismissing the local and navigational dimension

in Time for mapping
A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time
Cate Turk

process philosophy in conceptualising digital media. He writes: the digital image, whether static or in motion, is the result of continuous and ongoing computations. It does not exist as a thing made but as a thing that is continually in the making. (Barker, 2012: 264) Maps in whatever form are not static objects, but rather are dynamic, fluid and emerging. 202 (In)formalising The implications of such ontological instability for research about cartography are manifold. For critical cartographers, there is a practical conundrum of how to study and account for

in Time for mapping
Meg Holden

that society has wrought on the planet and, therefore, to steer humanity towards its holistic development potential, ecological principles need to take priority over social and economic ones in organising human groups and institutions. The approach is to elaborate an ontological commitment to ecological science and to derive from this, with a good dose of humility, an ecologically holistic ethos. Post- humanism is a perspective that supports holistic ecology. It advocates that people recognise their true limits and proper place within the biophysical community and

in The power of pragmatism