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Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

actually were allowed reformers to claim that their project was epistemological, the triumph of truth over fabulous error. Yet what it actually accomplished was the destruction of the objects that led to this truth. In the spirit of the recent theoretical return to the ontology of the object, we suggest that getting back to the medieval object in this case might well be a way to get back to the history of

in Affective medievalism
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

Did it start with Bergson, or before? Space was treated as the dead, the fixed, the undialectical, the immobile. Time, on the contrary, was richness, fecundity, life, dialectic. Michel Foucault 1 The traditional ontology of the

in Affective medievalism
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Medieval and medievalist practice
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

is the vision of medievalism that holds the medieval past always already available for cultural and imaginative recuperation. Such a vision precedes and informs the medieval even before we begin to pursue it in scholarly or creative ways. Not everyone will agree with this vision of medievalism and the ontological priority we claim for it. To suggest that medievalism might be the pretext to the medieval

in Affective medievalism
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Rationality, intelligence and human status
Irina Metzler

medieval (or other pre-modern cultures) just simply did not recognise intellectual differences. The question of how people regarded as intellectually deficient were treated socially by their respective cultures is of course the big question that interests historians most, but that does not detract from the fact that the labels (in all their, by modern ‘scientific’ standards, confusing, multifarious and rather woolly terminologies) existed in the first place. Therefore ID has an ontologically ambiguous status. On the one hand, ID exists as a real

in Fools and idiots?
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

, that medieval studies is hopelessly invested in a backwards-looking positivistic project, denying academic positions and futures to (younger) scholars who might be able to revivify their discipline. We have argued that the relationship between the medieval and the medievalist can no longer (if it ever could) be reduced to a simple hierarchy that could be seen as either chronologically or ontologically

in Affective medievalism
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Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

this section recent discussions about the importance of affect to literary study. Epistemological and ontological questions give way, in this chapter, to affective ones. Specifically, we begin with the ways in which love for the past has coloured the formation of medieval literary studies. The received narrative is based on a series of binaries. Initially an enthusiasm that supported and justified the study of the

in Affective medievalism
Chaucerian Beckets
Helen Barr

Tales. This chapter argues that the Beryn-poet recognises that Chaucer’s Pardoner is fashioned from the signs of Becketian relics. Further, the poet reproduces the interplay between body and relics to question the ontology of both anatomy and devotional practice. The Chaucerian Pardoners in The Canterbury Tales and The Canterbury Interlude are figures for the work of figuration. On the road to Canterbury and within its walls, the Pardoners’ bodies reproduce the desire for the traffic in relics so closely bound up with the body of Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral

in Transporting Chaucer
James Paz

are often characterised as adhering to strict ontological hierarchies (the scala naturae which situates God at the summit of Creation, followed by angels, then humans and then animals and plants and stones), in the world of the riddles a rich array of entities—beasts and birds, tools and weapons, food and drink, weather, stars and planets—appear on an equal footing as lively, sentient, talkative wihta (‘creatures’). These weird creatures challenge us to rethink the ways in which we, as humans, attempt to codify the world, expanding our ordinary modes of

in Riddles at work in the early medieval tradition
Open Access (free)
On Anglo-Saxon things
James Paz

theorists such as Jane Bennett, whose concept of ‘thing-​power’ in Vibrant Matter (2010) seeks to ‘acknowledge that which refuses to dissolve completely into the milieu of human knowledge’ while aiming to ‘attend to the it as actant’.10 Even more recently, Ian Bogost’s Alien Phenomenology (2012) situates things at the centre of being and advocates the use of metaphor in philosophy as a means of glimpsing things as they exist outside of human consciousness.11 The work of Levi Bryant (2011) puts entities at all levels of scale on equal ontological footing and Timothy Morton

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
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Aldhelm’s leech riddle – Peter Buchanan
Peter Buchanan

Animacies . Chen uses the concept of animacy hierarchies, which organise different forms of matter according to their ability to act, to map a web of interactions between human, animal, and so-called inanimate matter, and categories of language, race, and queerness. Chen treats the animacy hierarchy, a creation of anthropological linguistics, ‘as naturally also an ontology of affect : for animacy hierarchies are precisely about which things can or cannot affect—or be affected by—which other things within a specific scheme of possible action’. 10 Chen’s project

in Riddles at work in the early medieval tradition