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Swinburne’s journalism 1857–75
Laurel Brake

production, and reproduces it largely as originally published; in 1877 he denounces it to Thomas Purnell, editor of the Tatler, while allowing him to publish A Year’s Letters in his weekly Swinburne’s diverse responses resemble those of other late Victorian writers including Matthew Arnold, Henry James, and Oscar Wilde who valued and denounced the press while persisting in writing for it. Typical too

in Algernon Charles Swinburne
Masturbation and same-sex desire in Teleny
Diane Mason

First published in 1893, Teleny, or The Reverse of the Medal , the classic erotic novel of homosexual love, is, perhaps, today best known for its alleged associations with Oscar Wilde. Indeed, authorship of the 1986 Gay Men’s Press edition is explicitly attributed to ‘Oscar Wilde and others’. 1 Critical speculation and emphasis on the enigma of its production has, however, resulted in a critical tendency to concentrate on Teleny ’s relationship to Wilde’s wider literary output and cultural (or, alternately, subcultural) milieu. On the

in The secret vice
Conflicting signifiers of vice in The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Mystery of Edwin Drood
Diane Mason

‘Mad Hungers’: Dorian Gray and drug addiction In his 1999 book A Geography of Victorian Gothic Fiction: Mapping History’s Nightmares , Robert Mighall examines the way in which Oscar Wilde utilises ‘physiognomical codes for sensational and narrative effects’ in The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). 1 Drawing on Victorian medical discourse as a basis for his reading, Mighall suggests that the symptomatology of ‘onanism can be considered a likely candidate for an imaginative model’ in the construction of Wilde

in The secret vice
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Masturbation in Victorian fiction and medical culture
Author: Diane Mason

This book provides a reading of both fictional and medical writings concerned with auto-erotic sexuality in the long nineteenth century. It examines the discourse on masturbation in medical works by influential English, Continental and American practitioners such as J. H. Kellogg, E. B. Foote, Havelock Ellis, Krafft-Ebing and R. V. Pierce, as well as a number of anonymously authored texts popular in the period. The book demonstrates the influence and impact of these writings, not only on the underworld literatures of Victorian pornography but also in the creation of well-known characters by authors now regarded as canonical including Dean Farrar, J. S. Le Fanu, Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker. It is not merely a consideration of the male masturbator however: it presents a study of the largely overlooked literature on female masturbation in both clinical and popular medical works aimed at the female reader, as well as in fiction. The book concludes with a consideration of the way the distinctly Victorian discourse on masturbation has persisted into the late-twentieth and twenty-first centuries with particular reference to Willy Russell's tragic-comic novel, The Wrong Boy (2000) and to the construction of ‘Victorian Dad’, a character featured in the adult comic, Viz.

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Catherine Maxwell and Stefano Evangelista

When, in 1895, various writers were asked who should be the next Poet Laureate after Tennyson, Oscar Wilde’s reply was emphatic: ‘Mr Swinburne is already the Poet Laureate of England. The fact that his appointment to this high commission has not been degraded by official confirmation renders his position all the more unassailable. He whom all poets love is the Laureate

in Algernon Charles Swinburne
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Beatrice Grimshaw and the commercial woman writer
Jane Mahony and Eve Patten

associated Lane’s firm with the ‘New Woman’, while the contemporaneous publication of Oscar Wilde 87 Jane Mahony and Eve Patten (Salome in 1894, illustrated by Beardsley) and The Yellow Book (also between 1894 and 1897), identified it with Aestheticism and Decadence. Publication of the Keynotes series came at a pivotal time in the campaign of sustained, hostile reaction to the New Woman undertaken by newspapers and periodicals in the late 1880s and 1890s, peaking after the ‘critical uproar’ that followed the publication of Blanche Alethea Crackanthorpe’s article ‘The

in Irish women’s writing, 1878–1922
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Jan Montefiore

successor to Tennyson as Poet Laureate,4 and whose near-death from pneumonia in 1899 was headline news in three continents. Praise was never undiluted: his ‘vulgarity’ was mocked by Oscar Wilde and attacked by Robert Buchanan and, more devastatingly, Max Beerbohm;5 and as Kipling’s imperialist opinions became more strident after the Boer War he lost the 2 In Time’s eye esteem of British literary intellectuals, whom he in turn despised (his close friends included no fellow writer except Rider Haggard, author of thrillingly mythopoeic imperialist fantasy novels). Though

in In Time’s eye
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Anna Pilz and Whitney Standlee

of Irish literature. There is, for instance, a well-known poster of Irish writers that showcases, against a sepia background, the names, brief biographies, and photographs of twelve authors who are seen to stand as testament to the quality of Irish literature:  J.  M. Synge, Flann O’Brien, Oliver Goldsmith, Jonathan Swift, Samuel Beckett, W. B. Yeats, Brendan Behan, Oscar Wilde, Patrick Kavanagh, James Joyce, Sean O’Casey, and George Bernard Shaw. This specifically gendered accumulation of the country’s literati is not altogether surprising: Irish writing has often

in Irish women’s writing, 1878–1922
Howard J. Booth

feels after he is hit by the young officer Ouless, leading to a cathartic fight, can be read in sexual terms as desire, frustration and release. 43 John Moray Stuart-Young, the subject of a 2006 study by Stephanie Newell, was brought up in one of the poorest areas of Manchester. Working as a clerk he funded the lifestyle of a well-off aesthete by embezzling from his employer. He began to write to his literary heroes, among them Oscar Wilde, Edward Carpenter and Rudyard Kipling. In later memoirs he claimed that he was lifted out of Manchester by the intervention of

in In Time’s eye
Cosmopolitanism and cultural mediation in aesthetic criticism
Stefano Evangelista

to be got from France and why – that is a crucial episode in the early history of aestheticism, establishing its roots, cultural mission, and future directions as they would appear in the better-known critical writings of Pater and Oscar Wilde. The dominant note of Arnold’s criticism in this period is his impatience with his perceived narrowness of nineteenth-century English

in Algernon Charles Swinburne