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Lyly, euphuism and a history of non-reading (1632–1905)
Andy Kesson

supposedly unnatural, corrupting rhetoric, though not yet in the name of euphuism. The third part of the chapter shows how an 1820 novel helped euphuism to displace Lyly himself, to stand for the writer whilst also encompassing something much bigger. The final section examines the association of Walter Pater and Oscar Wilde with euphuism at the end of the nineteenth century and shows how the

in John Lyly and Early Modern Authorship
Sarah Annes Brown

uncanny traditions he is tapping into enhances the effective ambiguities attendant on James’s fall. This is yet another example of the uncanny – like allusion – benefiting from understatement. We have already seen a confusion between suicide and Doppelgänger murder in both of Hogg’s tales, and in several other texts, including Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘William Wilson’ (1839) and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture

in A familiar compound ghost
Steve Sohmer

search for the shadowy four; it has not slacked since. As to those nominated as ‘Mr. W.H.’, the list ranges from William Herbert to Henry Wroithesley (with initials reversed) to William Harvey (Wroithesley’s stepfather). In 1964 Leslie Hotson proposed one William Hatcliffe of Lincolnshire [!], while Thomas Tyrwitt, Edmond Malone, and Oscar Wilde all favoured a (fictional) boy actor

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
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Victoria Coldham-Fussell

as the province of comic drama, so long as their negative consequences are limited. Aristotle takes it for granted that laughter on the stage will always be directed at the preoccupations and intrigues of low-class people (a rule that the drawing-room comedies of Oscar Wilde happily reversed). 19 Renaissance literary critics often echoed this rule of thumb regarding social class and humour, together with the connection between laughter and ugliness also forged by Aristotle (and Cicero and Quintilian after him). 20 However, comic practice could be far more

in Comic Spenser
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A brief digression on twins
R. S. White

identical twin who is socially and temperamentally different from him. The influence behind it is more likely to be Shakespeare’s Errors than Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest , because of the curious celebrity of the former in India, in different language-speaking communities. Richard Allen argues that there is a special affinity between The Comedy of Errors and

in Shakespeare’s cinema of love
Robert Ormsby

both Volumnia’s and Aufidius’ hands. At the time Edith Evans played Volumnia, she was appreciated primarily as a comic actress. She had already played a show-stealing Nurse against Olivier and John Gielgud in a 1935 Romeo and Juliet, and would have been widely recognized in 1959 for her portrayal of Oscar Wilde’s comically monstrous aristocrat Lady Bracknell in The Importance of Being

in Coriolanus
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Shakespeare’s brute part
Richard Wilson

, ‘When earthly things made even / Atone together’ [ 5,4,98 ], Shakespeare’s escapology had developed into a game of artful but persistent evasion of these self-proclaimed ‘Great Britons’. 18 Oscar Wilde mischievously proposed that the love-object of the Sonnets was a Welsh boy-player named Willy Hughes. But biographers have preferred the feckless William Herbert – ‘ colofn y deyrnas : the pillar

in Free Will
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Our Lyly?
Andy Kesson

inappropriately feminine are deeply rooted in late nineteenth-century concerns over manly style and were given an electric vitality by the aftermath of Oscar Wilde’s trials and death. If reception history involves the application and interpretation of past literature within the present, the names of the principal figures may well be contributing here to an almost allegorical significance, in which the flowery

in John Lyly and Early Modern Authorship
The men behind the masks of Falstaff, Faulconbridge, Lamord and Hamlet
Steve Sohmer

., (London: K. Paul, 1888 ); and, of course, Oscar Wilde, ‘The portrait of Mr. W.H.,’ Blackwood’s Edinburgh magazine (July 1889), pp. 1–21. 2 Unless otherwise noted, biographical data in this chapter relies on The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online (Oxford: Oxford University Press

in Shakespeare for the wiser sort
Romantic comedy
R. S. White

Schnee (1920)), Oscar Wilde’s Lady Windermere’s Fan (1925), and Carmen , titled Gipsy Blood in America (1918), all in Germany. His To Be or Not to Be (1942), although predominantly a satirical rather than romantic comedy, is full of obvious references to Shakespeare, not least in the title. 18 Lubitsch’s name is always linked with the phrase ‘sophisticated comedy’ and his

in Shakespeare’s cinema of love