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Ronald Hyam

militant and promiscuous. 50 In 1889 flogging was introduced for homosexual solicitation. There were a number of unsavoury scandals. These involved high Dublin Castle officials (1884), London telegraph boys and aristocrats (Cleveland Street, 1889-90), Piccadilly rent boys, street vendors, valets and unemployed stable lads in the scandal concerning Oscar Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas (1895). A. C. Benson

in Empire and sexuality
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Ainslie T. Embree

Imagining America , Peter Conrad describes how famous British travel writers – Mrs Trollope, Dickens, Oscar Wilde and the rest – knew what they were going to see in America because ‘America’ was a construct of the European imagination, and before coming they had, like Columbus, ‘imagined America’. India has had much the same experience of being ‘imagined’ by writers for whom it was a necessary creation, the

in Asia in Western fiction
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Jeffrey Richards

Elwyn-Jones, were to perform the Lord Chancellor’s song from Iolanthe. Admiral Lord Fisher, ‘Jacky Fisher’, went several times to HMS Pinafore and adored it. Even Oscar Wilde loved the send-up of himself in Patience . 43 After the army, the navy, education, the law and politics, the Empire and the imperial mission came in for its dose of satire in Utopia Limited

in Imperialism and music
Dame Emma Albani, Dame Nellie Melba, Dame Clara Butt
Jeffrey Richards

Metropolitan Opera, New York, damaged her vocal chords, and she avoided Wagner thereafter. Melba became the most famous living Australian, her career important evidence to Australians that they could hold their own with the products of the mother country. Oscar Wilde told her: ‘I am the lord of language and you are the Queen of Song.’ 21 Melba never let anyone forget that she was Australian. She declared

in Imperialism and music
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Problems and approaches
Ronald Hyam

To adapt Oscar Wilde’s dictum on Socialism. Instead of dividing people into heterosexual and homosexual, I believe it might be more in tune with reality to divide them into a-sexual and bisexual: that is, those who are not keen on sexual activity and those who are. For a-sexuality see discussion on pp. 12-13. For’lethal’labelling, see Fr. Rolfe, The Desire and Pursuit of the

in Empire and sexuality
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Ronald Hyam

-Greene, London, 1983, pp. 75-6. 5 T. Pakenham, The Boer War, London, 1979, pp. 32-4. 6 R. Ellmann, Oscar Wilde, London, 1987, pp. 38, 423; J. Lees-Milne, The Enigmatic Edwardian: the Life of Reginald, 2nd Viscount Esher, London, 1986, p. 99; H. R

in Empire and sexuality
Ronald Hyam

renowned for an open sexual permissiveness and the complaisancy of its beautiful women and boys. Particularly after the laws relating to male sexuality diverged so dramatically in Britain and Italy at the end of the nineteenth century, and after the Oscar Wilde trials, in the next ten years a steady flow of British literati found it a congenial haven: Somerset Maugham and E. F. Benson, Lord Alfred Douglas

in Empire and sexuality
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Kipling’s secret sharer
Norman Etherington

Ayesha in Haggard’s work, or the unveiling of old Dorian Gray’s picture in Oscar Wilde’s novel, as well as like Jekyll’s transition into Hyde: ‘Anything approaching the change that came over his features I have never seen before, and hope never to see again. Oh, I wasn’t touched. I was fascinated. It was as though a veil had been rent. I saw on that ivory face the expression of

in Imperium of the soul
Mary A. Conley

recriminalisation of homosexuality in the 1885 Criminal Law Amendment Act, and the increasing social reproach for homosexuality by the 1880s and 1890s as evidenced by scandals like the Cleveland Street and Oscar Wilde trials. 94 Social fears cast homosexuality as a danger to the very foundations of Victorian virtues of domesticity, work and duty. John Tosh notes that the figure of the homosexual represented

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
The ‘nigger’ minstrel and British imperialism
Michael Pickering

A mask tells us more than a face. (Oscar Wilde) Introduction The comic blackface with its broad manic grin has only recently slipped from regular view as a staple icon in our culture. Though there were subsequent borrowings in other cultural forms, such as advertising and juvenile literature, its most important manifestation from the outset was

in Acts of supremacy