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Henry Miller

2 Party politics and portraiture, 1832–46 This chapter shows how visual images personified and reaffirmed the party identities that were formed in the wake of the 1832 Reform Act. By examining the semi-official portrait series that were published in this period, this chapter highlights the innovative new ways in which party identities were presented after 1832. These broke new ground by exploiting steel engraving, which greatly increased the number of prints that could be produced, to appeal to supporters of the rival Conservative and Reform parties. A study of

in Politics personified
Henry Miller

7 Disraeli, Gladstone and the personification of party, 1868–80 This chapter shows how Benjamin Disraeli (1803–81), who was created 1st Earl of Beaconsfield in 1876, and William Ewart Gladstone (1809–98) came to personify the Conservative and Liberal parties after the 1867 Representation of the People Act. Disraeli was prime minister on two occasions, 1868 and 1874–80, and Gladstone four, 1868–74, 1880–85, 1886 and 1892–94. In an era with an expanded borough electorate and more sophisticated party organisation at a local and national level, new requirements

in Politics personified
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Portraiture, caricature and visual culture in Britain, c. 1830–80
Author: Henry Miller

This book examines the role of political likenesses in a half-century that was crucial for the political modernisation of Britain, a two-party system that began to take shape and politicians became increasingly accountable and responsive to public opinion. Political language, especially electoral rhetoric, has been accorded considerable weight by recent studies in building broad coalitions of political support in popular and electoral politics. The book studies political likenesses, the key mode of visual politics at this time, as part of a nuanced analysis of contemporary political culture and the nature of the representative system. It examines a diverse range of material including woven silk portraiture, oil paintings, numismatics and medals, banners, ceramics, statuary and memorials as well as items printed on paper or card. After an analysis of the visual culture spawned by the reform bills of 1831-1832, the book shows how Conservative and Liberal/Reformer identities were visualised through semi-official series of portrait prints. The pictorial press, photographs and portrait testimonials, statues and memorials, MPs were venerated as independent representatives and champions of particular localities, trades, interests or issues, and not party hacks. Depictions of Lord Palmerston and his rivals, including Lord John Russell and Lord Derby, in the 1850s and 1860s often underplayed in pictorial representations to emphasise physical and political vigour. The role of political portraits and cartoons in the decade after the passing of the 1867 Representation of the People Act is also discussed.

Drawings by Peruvian Shining Path war survivors
Anouk Guiné

Iconography of a prison massacre: drawings by Peruvian Shining Path war survivors Anouk Guiné In Peru, many artists and their works are still under the strict surveillance of mainstream art and political institutions. The hostile climate is the product of a highly polarised country whose state ideological apparatuses are controlled by fierce opponents of the Partido Comunista del Perú (PCP, Communist Party of Peru), also known as Sendero Luminoso (SL, Shining Path). In 1963 after the Sino-Soviet split, the PCP began preparing a ‘proletarian revolution’. The

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution
Abstract only
Henry Miller

Introduction The political likeness attained a remarkable popularity and cultural resonance between 1830 and 1880. Portraits and political cartoons were produced commercially on an ever-increasing scale. The proliferation of likenesses was not simply due to the exploitation of new visual technologies, but clearly answered a very real demand. This book examines the role of political likenesses in a halfcentury that was crucial for the political modernisation of Britain, in which the electorate gradually expanded, a two-party system began to take shape and

in Politics personified
Maoism, art and dissidence in Spain
Noemi de Haro García

Family). This group was part of the Unión Popular de Artistas (UPA, Popular Union of Artists), which supported the Frente Revolucionario Antifascista y Patriota (FRAP, Revolutionary, AntiFascist and Patriot Front), a group that had originated in the Partido Comunista de España (marxista-leninista) (PCE(m-l), Spanish Communist MarxistLeninist Party). The Archivo General had to keep undelivered mail for one year for it to be considered ‘correspondencia caducada’ (expired correspondence) according to the rules governing the Spanish postal services at the time.2 This is

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution
Global days of action and photographs of resistance
Antigoni Memou

6 Carnival Against Capitalism: global days of action and photographs of resistance C a r n i va l s A g a i n s t C a p i t a l were mounted on numerous Global Days of Action in the late 1990s, signalling the emergence of a movement against neoliberal globalisation and for global justice. The first global street party was called on 16 May (M16) 1998 by London Reclaim the Streets (RTS) and the newly founded People’s Global Action (PGA) to coincide with the G8 summit in Birmingham and the following week’s WTO ministerial meeting in Geneva. Over thirty street

in Photography and social movements
Colette Gaiter

The Black Panther newspaper and revolutionary aesthetics Colette Gaiter The Black Panther Party (BPP) and the Maoist Chinese artists who created posters and visual images in the 1960s and 1970s spread political ideology through empathetic, simple and bold images of everyday people. Viewers of these images could actually see themselves as revolutionaries by identifying with their protagonists. Emory Douglas, the Minister of Culture, designer, illustrator and ‘revolutionary artist’ for the BPP, was ‘the Norman Rockwell of the ghetto’,1 portraying poor and working

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution
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Mao and visuality in twentieth-century India
Sanjukta Sunderason

of oppositionality and marginality – even at the heart of national centres – disturbs the doxa or momentum of national dialogues and its rhetoric of modernity. ‘Direct contact’: taking art ‘to the people’ A page from People’s War (Illustration 4.1), the national organ of the Communist Party of India (CPI) between 1942 and 1945, is a pointer to the visual milieu within which a left-wing cultural radicalism was gaining shape in India during the Second World War. The movement developed under the shadow of a growing transnational anti-fascist activism under the Popular

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution