Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 143 items for :

  • Manchester Medieval Sources x
Clear All
E.A. Jones

should warn and effectively coerce the said Thomas the hermit that he should make reparation for the foregoing transgressions to our church and the neighbouring parish churches and to other parties injured by the foregoing within fifteen days from the same warning as he is obliged to do; and issue a public injunction in each church in the vicinity of the said hermitage, and other places that seem expedient to you, to him and to each and every

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

Genoa he was entirely set free [to return home] by Pope Gregory IX within the space of three days. 127 This archbishop was a very learned man, and especially skilled in the art of medicine. In the time of this archbishop, in the year of the Lord 1241, the imperial party in Genoa, who were known as the Mascherati, withdrew from the city, and the lord Ansaldo de Mari was named chief admiral by

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

an outline order for making a hermit similar to [ 49 ]. 51. Can a hermit marry? A judgement of Archbishop Arundel Strictly speaking, marriages in the Middle Ages were supposed to be solemnised by the ecclesiastical authorities in church. But the essential components for a legal marriage required the presence only of the couple themselves: a verbal contract in which both parties

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

area of Sicily, either to seek them out if they were already present, or await them if they were absent. Then the Venetians might present their claims, and the Genoese would produce theirs likewise, and God—who knows all secrets and assesses all men most wisely—would in his judgment weigh the claims of both parties on his scale, and the law would give to each his rights insofar as He should see fit and as justice should demand. Once these letters were sent

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

) This Cato favoured the party of Pompey against Caesar since he believed Caesar to be an enemy of the commonwealth. Thus when he heard that the aforesaid Caesar had gained victory over Pompey, so great was his honour that he sought out poison and his sword: having taken the poison, he stuck his sword into himself and inflicted a [fatal] wound lest he see his enemy Caesar ruling the commonwealth. Speaking on behalf of the commonwealth, this Cato spoke

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

proclaimed everywhere to everyone. Yet he was a serious and cautious man, and for this reason in the meantime he was not moved (except to tears) until their faction was revealed and confirmed by the very men who had openly been a party to such wicked plans: that this selfsame tyrant wanted to kill the emperor secretly by some means, so that it would appear that he had died suddenly from an illness of his, and then to kill his sons, together with whichever of the most important magnates of the realm he could seize beforehand through trickery. When it was reported by men of

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
E.A. Jones

himself [ 2 ]. On this last point he would want to ensure that all interested parties had been consulted, and in particular the rector of the church to which the reclusory would be annexed [ 3e ]. Though an anchorite of good repute might be an asset to any church (both increasing its spiritual merit and, through the visitors and pilgrims he or she might attract, benefiting it materially as well), proprietors might equally have

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

.3). Thirdly, Jacopo mediated a general peace in Genoa in January 1295 between the city's main factions, the Rampini and Mascherati. This was nominally an opposition of Guelfs v. Ghibellines—supporters of the papal and imperial parties respectively—but it was exacerbated by more immediate local disputes of neighbourhood and kinship; as Jacopo reports: ‘these dissensions, divisions, and factions persisted for fifty-five years and more

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

of property on Severus’ part here, so res is probably best understood as referring to the subject matter at hand, i.e., the virtues of Arsenius. It is possible, however, to read Pascasius’ remark as a knowing nod to Terence so that both parties know that res jokingly refers to property. 336 Fortassis ergo hunc omnes noti omnesque amici et commilitones ita deserunt. Cf. Terence, Eunuchus 2.2.7 (238): quo redactus sum? Omnes noti me atque amici deserunt. (‘What have I been reduced to? All of my acquaintances and friends desert me.’) 337 Bonos consectari

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
Gervase Rosser

party-wall and roofed with joists and boards, so that the seats of the privies of the plaintiffs and the others could not be seen, Joan de Armenters and William de Thorneye have removed the party-wall and roof so that the extremities of those sitting upon the seats can be seen, a thing which is abominable and altogether intolerable. Judgement, after the site

in Towns in medieval England