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‘Of magic look and meaning’: themes concerning the cultural chess-player
John Sharples

definition of ‘Automaton’, quoted in W. B. Hyman, ‘Introduction’, in W. B. Hyman (ed.), The Automaton in English Renaissance Literature (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011), p. 5. 12 A cultural history of chess-players  6 ‘Acknowledgements’, in A. S. Mittman (ed.) with P. Dendle, The Ashgate Research Companion to Monsters and the Monstrous (Farnham: Ashgate, 2012), p. xxii.  7 D. H. Li, The Genealogy of Chess (Bethesda, MD: Premier Publishing, 1998).  8 H. Golombek, A History of Chess (London: Routledge, 1976), p. 10.  9 R. Eales, Chess: The History of a Game (Glasgow

in A cultural history of chess-players
Three lives of the chess-player in medieval and early-modern literature
John Sharples

explains the whole. “At this [story] every man laughed … for the lye.”’64 The story, that is, was well understood as parody, a temporary carnival space where that which was peripheral (India; Portugal; ape; at play) became the centre, reorienting the social landscape. These stories existed in a well-established lineage of similar stories – ‘a recurring motif [within Renaissance literature] in ape and monkey folk lore has to do with the animal’s ability to play chess, fetch wine from taverns, and do other feats s­ eemingly requiring the ability to reason’.65 The emphasis

in A cultural history of chess-players
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IBM’s Deep Blue and the Automaton Chess-Player, 1997–1769
John Sharples

: Springer, 2013), pp. 145–6, for a discussion of the evolution of the term artificial intelligence.  3 W. B. Hyman, ‘Introduction’, in W. B. Hyman (ed.), The Automaton in English Renaissance Literature (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011), p. 5.  4 Ibid., pp. 5–6.  5 M. Serres, Statues: The Second Book of Foundations, trans. R. Burks (London: Bloomsbury, 2015), pp. 1–4.  6 Ibid., p. 5.  7 S. During, Modern Enchantments: The Cultural Power of Secular Magic (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002), p. 1.  8 R. A. Gilbert, ‘David Brewster’, in G. Budge et al. (eds

in A cultural history of chess-players
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Kasparov and the machines
John Sharples

Daguerrean Mystique’, in G. Clarke (ed.), The Portrait in Photography (London: Reaktion, 1992), p. 185. Arthur’s tale had appeared in an article in Godey’s Lady Book in 1849. 41 See also Martin, Curious Visions, p. 90. 42 W. B. Hyman, ‘Introduction’, in W. B. Hyman (ed.), The Automaton in English Renaissance Literature (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011), p. 4. 43 Spooner, ‘Technologies’, p. 673. 44 Trachtenberg, ‘Likeness as Identity’, p. 185. 45 Ibid., p. 186. 46 Ibid. 47 G. McCool, ‘Say Good Knight, Garry’, Pittsburgh Post Gazette, 12 May 1997, p. 2. 48 R. Chandrasekaran

in A cultural history of chess-players
Religion, persecution and identity in Britain and Ireland, 1558–1794
J.C.D. Clark

Identities and English Renaissance Literature (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 37–50. But there is no overview of the exilic movement. 7 Bernard Cottret, The Huguenots in England: Immigration and Settlement c. 1550–1700 (Cambridge, 1991); Robin D. Gwynn, Huguenot Heritage: The History and Contribution of the Huguenots in Britain (1986; 2nd edn, Brighton, 2001). 8 H.T. Dickinson, ‘The poor Palatines and the parties’, English Historical Review, 82 (1967), 464–85. Yet toleration had clear limits. When perhaps as many as 2,000 Catholics were found to be among the estimated 10

in British and Irish diasporas