Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "Renaissance literature" x
  • Manchester Medieval Studies x
Clear All
Abstract only

’ (p. 3). 16 Taylor, The Sky of Our Manufacture, p. 7. On human ‘indistinction’ see Jean Feerick and Vin Nardizzi (eds), The Indistinct Human in Renaissance Literature (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). 17 Taylor separates the latter, more abstract perspective into climate – which conveys ‘ideas, politics, cultural forms, bioregions and weather patterns’ (The Sky of Our Manufacture, p. 8; see also p. 14) – but medieval geohumoralism enmeshed these spheres. On the long history of climate from classical Greece onwards, emphasising its descriptive

in Contemporary Chaucer across the centuries

. Hartmann and E. Gössmann in Antiqui und Moderni: Traditionsbewusstsein und Fortschrittsbewusstsein im späten Mittelalter , ed. A. Zimmerman (Berlin, 1974), pp. 21–57. 16 See in general J. W. Dean, The World Grown Old in Later Medieval Literature (Cambridge, Mass., 1997). 17 Reynolds, ‘Social mentalities’, p. 22. See also D. Spadafora, The Idea of Progress in Eighteenth Century Britain (New Haven, 1990). 18 Reynolds, ‘Social mentalities’, p. 25. 19 C. S. Lewis, The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature (Cambridge

in Law, laity and solidarities
The role of Noah’s wife in the Chester play of Noah’s Flood

Backgrounds for Descriptions of the Flood in Medieval and Renaissance Literature’, Studies in Philology 94 (1997), pp. 137–59. 3 Epiphanius of Salamis, Panarion , vol. 1, trans. Frank Williams, 2nd edn (Leiden: Brill, 2009), 2.26.1.7–8, p. 91. 4 Anna J. Mill, ‘Noah's Wife Again’, Proceedings of the

in Enacting the Bible in medieval and early modern drama

(Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2007, pp. 1–34, at p. 1). See in detail Thomas S. Freeman, ‘“ Imitatio Christi with a Vengeance”: The Politicisation of Martyrdom in Early-Modern England’, in Freeman and Mayer (eds), Martyrs and Martyrdom , pp. 35–69, at pp. 43–50. See Julia Reinhard Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology, and Renaissance Literature (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1996) as well as Dailey, English Martyr , chs 1, 2. 4

in Enacting the Bible in medieval and early modern drama
Abstract only
The Scottish Legendary and narrative art

 York: Oxford University Press, 1988), at p. 18, and Michael Goodich, Vita Perfecta:  The Ideal of Sainthood in the Thirteenth Century (Stuttgart: Hiersemann, 1982, at p. 206. 46 Edith Wyschogrod, Saints and Postmodernism:  Revisioning Moral Philosophy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990), p. xxiii. 47 Wyschogrod, Saints and Postmodernism, p. 33. 48 Wyschogrod, Saints and Postmodernism, p. 256. 49 Julia Reinhard Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints:  Hagiography, Typology, and Renaissance Literature (Stanford:  Stanford University Press, 1996). 50 See e.g. Sheila Delany, Impolitic

in The Scottish Legendary
Time, space, and the Scottishness of the Scottish Legendary

Conversion of the Physical World: The Creation of a Christian Landscape’, in James Muldoon (ed.), Varieties of Religious Conversion in the Middle Ages (Gainesville:  University of Florida Press, 1997), pp. 63–78, at p. 65. 23 Julia Reinhard Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology, and Renaissance Literature (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press), p. 64. 24 ‘Petrus autem ipsum in Iherosolimam duxit et omnia loca in quibus Christus predicavit, miracula fecit, locum etiam in quo passus est et in quo celos ascendit eidem ostendit’ (cap. XCII, 108: ‘But

in The Scottish Legendary

University Press, 1963 [1932]), p. 6. Elsie Vaughan Hitchcock (ed.), William Roper: The Lyfe of Sir Thomas Moore, knighte, EETS O.S. 197 (London: Oxford University Press, 1958 [1935]). Harpsfield’s Life is dedicated to Roper, who commissioned it.  2 See L.E. Semler, ‘Virtue, Transformation, and Exemplarity in The Lyfe of Johan Picus’, in A.D. Cousins and Damian Grace (eds), A Companion to Thomas More (Madison, WI: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2009), pp. 95–113.   3 Julia Reinhard Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology, and Renaissance Literature

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain
Abstract only

distinctiveness of common law and English character, Brian Lockley, Law and Empire in English Renaissance Literature (Cambridge, 2006), esp. 113–41. 18 David J. Seipp, ‘ Bracton , the Year Books, and the “transformation of elementary legal ideas” in the early common law’, Law and History Review 7 (1989), 175–217, esp. 175. 19 See Susan Reynolds, ‘The emergence of professional law in the long twelfth century’, and the response of Paul Brand , ‘The English difference’, both in Law and History Review 21 (2003), 347

in Justice and mercy
Abstract only
Sanctity as literature

/12/2014 15:34 Introduction 17 Renaissance forms of humanism and fails to acknowledge its continuity. For the concept of vernacular humanism, see also Andrew Galloway, ‘John Lydgate and the Origins of Vernacular Humanism’, Journal of English and Germanic Philology 107.4 (2008), pp. 445–71. 23 Julia Reinhard Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology, and Renaissance Literature (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996), p. xxi. The ‘passion of secularisation’, which implies that the processes that underlie the secularising of saintly discourse can be an

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain

thematic focus but also in its address to a feminine audience (pp. 330–1). 16 Julia Reinhard Lupton finds in this convergence a premature effort on Chaucer’s part ‘to force a particular blossoming of secular literature in the interstices of hagiography’, an effort that would find more successful fruition in Boccaccio’s Decameron and Chaucer’s own Canterbury Tales; see Lupton, Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology, and CONTZEN 9780719089701 PRINT (MAD0059) (G).indd 130 01/12/2014 15:34 Chaucer and hagiographic authority 131 Renaissance Literature (Stanford

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain