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Jasmine Allen

impression. As Holiday noted, in Stained Glass as an Art (1896), there was a general consensus, even at the end of the century, that stained glass should be ‘mediaeval’.139 Yet, in spite of its predominance in current scholarship, we must be cautious of assumptions that the Ecclesiological Society was the only driving force on the development of stained glass, as the international exhibitions reveal several other forces in play. The secularisation of stained glass Various scholars have explored the impact of the nineteenth-​century international exhibitions on consumption

in Windows for the world
From Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry to British Romantic art
Author: Hélène Ibata

The challenge of the sublime argues that the unprecedented visual inventiveness of the Romantic period in Britain could be seen as a response to theories of the sublime, more specifically to Edmund Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757). While it is widely accepted that the Enquiry contributed to shaping the thematics of terror that became fashionable in British art from the 1770s, this book contends that its influence was of even greater consequence, paradoxically because of Burke’s conviction that the visual arts were incapable of conveying the sublime. His argument that the sublime was beyond the reach of painting, because of the mimetic nature of visual representation, directly or indirectly incited visual artists to explore not just new themes, but also new compositional strategies and even new or undeveloped pictorial and graphic media, such as the panorama, book illustrations and capricci. More significantly, it began to call into question mimetic representational models, causing artists to reflect about the presentation of the unpresentable and the inadequacy of their endeavours, and thus drawing attention to the process of artistic production itself, rather than the finished artwork. By revisiting the links between eighteenth-century aesthetic theory and visual practices, The challenge of the sublime establishes new interdisciplinary connections which address researchers in the fields of art history, cultural studies and aesthetics.

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Jasmine Allen

rapid secularisation of the medium and its adaptation to modern settings and contexts, as influenced by and demonstrated at these exhibition environments. Chapter  4 seeks to ascertain whether those makers who exhibited stained glass at these events were representative of the nineteenth-​century stained glass industry at large. It outlines exhibitors’ roles in the bureaucratic organisation of exhibitions and their commercial incentives for participating, revealing how exhibitors responded to the demands of consumers. It demonstrates that these displays helped

in Windows for the world
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Mechthild Fend

Napoleon in the aftermath of the Egyptian campaign to the later colonial engagement 247 248 Fleshing out surfaces of France in North Africa. Ingres must have witnessed the impact that some of these developments, notably the Egyptian campaign, had on the artistic scene in Paris during the period before he left for Rome as he had a studio in the Couvent des Capucines, a former convent secularised during the Revolution and later allocated to artists.25 Among the artists who had their studios in the convent during the first decade of the nineteenth century were Girodet

in Fleshing out surfaces
Classification, organisation and status
Jasmine Allen

français, which opened in the suppressed convent of Petits-​Augustins in Paris from 1795 until 1816 under the direction of French archaeologist Alexandre Lenoir (1761–​1839), displayed a collection of French monuments including tombs, architectural sculptures, stained glass, and other artistic fragments confiscated from French churches following the secularisation of France.11 Little attention was paid to the subject matter or original context of the stained glass panels on display in the Musée des Monuments français, but their presence in all of the museum galleries

in Windows for the world
Hélène Ibata

a distance. It is this distance that gives us the cognitive and emotional space necessary for sublimity.’ Stephen K. White, Edmund Burke: Modernity, Politics, and Aesthetics (Thousand Oaks, CA, London and New Delhi:  Sage Publications, 1994), p. 28. 38 Burke, Philosophical Enquiry, I, vii, ‘Of the sublime’, pp. 36–​7. 39 As Philip Shaw argues, Burke’s Enquiry may be seen as a ‘secularised version of Burnet’s apocalypse’, in which terror and violence are mitigated by distance, and consequently become a source of aesthetic contemplation. Shaw, The Sublime, 6. 40

in The challenge of the sublime