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From the globalisation of the movement (1968) to the movement against globalisation (2001)
Author: Antigoni Memou

Throughout its brief history, photography has had a close relationship to social movements. From the Commune of Paris in 1871, the first political uprising to be captured by camera, to the 1990s anti-globalisation movement, the photographic medium has played a crucial role in political struggles. The book reflects critically on the theory of photography and the social movements themselves. It draws on a range of humanities disciplines, including photography theory and history, social movement theory, political theory, cultural history, visual culture, media studies and the history and theory of art. The book takes as a starting point 1968 - a year that witnessed an explosion of social movements worldwide and has been interpreted as a turning point for political practice and theory. The finishing point is 2001 - a signpost for international politics due to September 11 and a significant year for the movement because of the large-scale anti-capitalist protests in Genoa. Within these chronological limits, the book focuses on a selection of distinctive instances in which the photographic medium intersects with the political struggle. The three case studies are not the only pertinent examples, by any means, but they are important ones, not only historically and politically, but also iconographically. They are the student and worker uprising in France in May 1968 and two moments of the contemporary anti-capitalist movement, the indigenous Zapatista movement in Mexico and the anti-capitalist protests in Genoa in 2001.

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Belonging
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

identification of turban-wearing Muslim and Sikh cab drivers as terrorists in a post-9/11 New York. Turbans not only became visual signifiers of terrorism, but also carried implicit presumptions of a lack of American citizenship. For instance, Frank S. Roque, who killed Balbir Singh Sodhi, an Indian Sikh from Arizona, on 15 September 2001 was heard saying that he 191 192 Productive failure would ‘kill the rag heads responsible for September 11’, prior to his assaults, and when handcuffed, he said, ‘I stand for America all the way! I’m an American. Go ahead. Arrest me and

in Productive failure
Abstract only
Antigoni Memou

a finishing point 2001 − a signpost for international politics due to September 11 and a significant year for the movement because of the large-scale anti-capitalist protests in Genoa. Within these chronological limits, the book focuses on a selection of distinctive instances in which the photographic medium intersects with the political struggle. The three case studies are not the only pertinent examples, by any means, but they are important ones, not only historically and politically, but also iconographically. They are the student and worker uprising in France

in Photography and social movements
Word and image in the twenty-first century. Envoi
Catherine Gander and Sarah Garland

proliferation practices that Mitchell connects with biotechnical cloning. But as Anna Munster has noted in her discussion of ‘the clone, the sample and the differential’ in digital information aesthetics, the concept of cloning has existed more as an unstable, if titillating, link between science and the public imagination than as a scientifically successful integrational practice.30 Mitchell’s observation connects, however, with a recent ‘aesthetics of terror’ that has permeated not only popular culture but art galleries across the globe since the events of September 11

in Mixed messages
Jenny Lin

month after the terrorist attack on New York City’s World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, APEC Cityscape Fireworks constituted an unexpectedly timely and uncanny projection of the PRC’s rising economic might in the face of US collapse. The work’s grand finale consisted of a simulated eruption of contemporary Shanghai’s most iconic tower, Lujiazui’s Oriental Pearl Radio and Television Tower (Figure 4.4).45 In light of the attack on the World Trade Center, Cai Guo-Qiang’s orchestrated explosion from the Pearl Tower created a haunting sight that marked the start of a

in Above sea
Kimberly Lamm

photograph of Davis that depicts her as a smiling girl who wears pigtails and has flowers pinned to her collar. The FBI Wanted poster, in which Letters from an imaginary enemy, Angela Davis Cover of Life magazine, September 11, 1970. Photograph by David Dornlas. 77 2.2  78 Writing the ‘I’ otherwise Davis is decidedly not smiling, has been placed opposite the school photograph. When seen in relationship to the wanted poster and the photograph on the cover, the sweet school photograph provokes readers to wonder what happened to this innocent black girl who once

in Addressing the other woman
Jared Pappas-Kelley

Destroyed, as is Alexander Calder’s Bent Propeller, which was lost in the September 11 attacks on the Twin Towers in New York.132 Next to Attacked is Egon Schiele’s Self-Seer, and also, adjacent to the stenciled outline of the word Destroyed, is Tracey Emin’s tent Everyone I Have Ever Slept With, a piece lost in the Momart warehouse fire that will be discussed in more detail later.133 Bordering Stolen is a text in which Mundy references an intriguing turn of phrase—“a serious crime against the heritage of humanity”134— taken from the Deputy Culture Secretary for the City

in Solvent form
Anna Dezeuze

‘zone of indistinction’, I would suggest, has replaced Arendt’s shrinking ‘sphere of appearance’. It emerges at the crossroads of labour and action, as artists articulate joins that point to the concrete realities brushed aside by an ever-lighter capital, as they open up fragile spaces for temporary alliances, as their tactics hint at change as well as survival. It was partly in response to the so-called ‘war on terror’ launched by the American government after the September 11 attacks of 2001 that Judith Butler published a series of essays, written between 2001 and

in Almost nothing