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Fashion and protest
Ory Bartal

Mexican-American youths negotiated the identity of their subculture by using the zoot suit as a symbol of pride in their ethnicity and as ‘a spectacular reminder that the social order had failed to contain their energy and difference … The zoot suit was a refusal; a subcultural gesture that refused to concede to the manners of subservience.’5 Shehnaz Suterwalla, who studied four different groups of women (women who were punks in the late 1970s, women who lived at Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp in the 1980s, black women in the hip-hop community in the 1980–90s, and

in Critical design in Japan
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Ory Bartal

, and strength to its followers, and protects them from the constant threat of dispersion.37 In late consumer culture, the individual declares affiliation to a group or a subculture via the lifestyle that is expressed in the brand’s sign value. According to Baudrillard, the transformation of objects from functional things to signs of identity was followed by the transformation of the postmodern city into a sphere of codes and signs. The city ceased to be the politico-industrial zone that it was in the nineteenth century – a site of industrial concentration and

in Critical design in Japan
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Andy Campbell

Ulrich Obrist, and Rirkrit Tiravanija, ‘What is a Station?,’ E-Flux (2003), http://projects.e-flux.com/utopia/about.html (accessed 10 October 2017). 14 The Centers for Disease Control, ‘Pneumocystis Pneumonia—Los Angeles,’ Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 30:21 (1981), pp. 1–3. Of course June of 1981 was not the beginning of HIV/AIDS, only its first emergence in popular and scientific consciousness in the United States. 15 Richard Meyer, ‘SF Queer Subculture & Art History,’ lecture, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, 19 December 2012, https

in Bound together
Anna Dezeuze

to The Art of Assemblage, ‘has been singled out … to denote not only a specific technical procedure and form used in the literary and musical, as well as the plastic, arts, but also a complex of attitudes and ideas’.6 If New York Times critic John Canaday dismissed Seitz’s catalogue as ‘juvenile’ and a ‘bad mix-up of long hair and starry eyes’7 – terms resonating with the ‘square’ criticisms of ‘hip’ subcultures – it was partly because of the different adjectives used by the Art of Assemblage curator to describe the ‘attitudes and ideas’ of contemporary

in Almost nothing
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Bound together
Andy Campbell

a refusal to look and act like the ideal participant in white neoliberal capitalism.10 The work, via its title, greets its viewer with culturally specific terms of endearment, and likewise proposes a cholo revision of the ur-material of kink: leather. At the same time it complicates what the artist identifies as the ‘cis[-gender] het[erosexual] cholo subculture’ as one in need of revision and a more inclusive reclamation for queer and gender non-binary people.11 Picking up on Gayle Rubin’s insight that ‘fetishism raises all sorts of issues concerning shifts in the

in Bound together
Ory Bartal

of organisation, such as a different segmentation of the market, the introduction of various subcultures into the public sphere, the creation of new social classes, changes in the gender-based power balance, and an emphasis on personal identity. It created a new form of individualism, and crowned new cultural heroes. Consumer culture and popular culture also ascribed unprecedented importance to visual culture and to objects as the backdrop for innovative forms of cultural production and a new wave of critical design. Critical design The new product culture and the

in Critical design in Japan
Ory Bartal

established philosophical, psychological, or aesthetic convention of the ‘self’. These theories have shed light on the silenced areas in which the ‘other’ has no representation in language, culture, and politics in order to allow symbolic minorities and sub-cultures to have their voice and world view heard.4 By looking at binary models of masculinity and femininity, queer theory pointed to the fact that binary thinking is an arbitrary and aggressive fiction: not a biological reality but rather a cultural construct meant to invent the ‘normal’ or ‘right’ as the opposite of

in Critical design in Japan
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Modernising the interwar ideal home
Deborah Sugg Ryan

-Century Modern has gone alongside the proliferation of a diverse range of ‘vintage’ subcultures. For some, vintage is a question of re-enactment, trying to stay as faithful as possible to the clothing and tastes of a particular period. Live events such as Goodwood Revival or the Chap Olympics offer opportunities to perform vintage identities. For some, this is extended to their homes.29 I have a bulging file of examples of people who live a vintage lifestyle. What I was doing all those years ago in Oxford does not seem quite so eccentric now. Some women, me included, have

in Ideal homes, 1918–39
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Mao and visuality in twentieth-century India
Sanjukta Sunderason

time, ‘a mode for resisting it by means of reverse appropriation’.3 Visuality, he notes, carries a dialectical bind between authoritarian modes of picturing, as well as potential subversions and appropriations of such visual tropes by subaltern groups and subcultures. He calls the latter ‘Visuality 2’, echoing what Dipesh Chakraborty has called ‘History 2’ – subaltern or counter-hegemonic appropriations of the ‘totalising thrusts’ of a universalistic meta-modality of ‘History 1’.4 This historical agency of Visuality 2 then opens up a potential field of minor sights

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution
Colette Gaiter

to popular culture images had different motivations. American Pop art simultaneously elevated and mocked the rise of consumerism, 97 5.3  98 Art, Global Maoism and the Cultural Revolution suburbanisation, increased leisure, the explosion of television and media, and the spawning of celebrity culture. Even though many works of Pop art seemed to make fun of the Western mid-century middle class, they also (intentionally or not) upheld their values. Conversely, Douglas’s work came from a radical marginalised political ideology and subculture, while Pop artists

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution