Search results

David W. Gutzke

9 A youth subculture of drinking P ub and club going would become a mainstay of youth culture beginning in the 1980s, with four-fifths of all youths visiting them during the year. The fifteen- to twenty-four-year-olds were ten times more likely to go pubbing or clubbing than other age groups. Half of this age cohort frequented these venues at least monthly, with city centres of huge Northern cities – Liverpool, Manchester and Leeds, the club heartland – easily outdistancing London. From the mid-1990s, introduction of dance music revolutionized night clubs

in Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century
Rebecca Jennings

4 The Gateways club and the emergence of a post-war lesbian subculture A vibrant lesbian bar culture emerged alongside gay male subcultures in London and other British towns and cities in the years before the Second World War and played an important role in the development of collective lesbian identities in the post-war period. However, while gay male subcultures have become the focus of considerable scholarly attention in recent years, no comparable work has examined the significance of commercial subcultures in histories of female homosexuality in the UK

in Tomboys and bachelor girls
Abstract only
1990s style and the perennial return of Goth
Catherine Spooner

Gothic and Goth: new interventions At the end of the 1970s, a new youth subculture emerged from the fragmenting Punk scene, commonly known as Goth. Goth seemed to take the trappings of Gothic literature and film and convert them into a symbolic form of resistance to a suburban Britain (and subsequently America, Australia and elsewhere) perceived as

in Fashioning Gothic bodies
Abstract only
Rebecca Jennings

post-war histories also has further implications for narratives of post-war Britain. Accounts of the development of a specific lesbian subculture, emerging in the 1950s, and the Conclusion 175 educational objectives of the first lesbian magazine in the 1960s, undercut the notion of the 1960s as a decisive moment of radicalisation. Instead, they suggest a more gradual emergence of marginal cultures, predicated on diverse understandings of lesbian identity. More fundamentally, narratives of lesbian practices and collective action in the post-war decades as

in Tomboys and bachelor girls
Abstract only
Highland migrants in the Scottish city
T. M. Devine

alienating process where 246 CLANSHIP TO CROFTERS’ WAR the anonymity and insecurities of the city dissolve old cultures and loyalties and produce a more amorphous way of life. More recently, however, attention has been given to the development of urban ‘subcultures’. Some migrants may decide to ignore and eventually reject their ethnic backgrounds, but others find it a vital resource and those from a common culture can combine to face the challenges of urban life. This is rendered easier if those belonging to the subculture share a common language and religion which

in Clanship to crofters’ war
Abstract only
David W. Gutzke

People Think about Public Houses (1950), table 6; Market and Opinion Research International, Public Attitudes to Pubs and Leisure, June, 1984, p. 81. Gutzke_WomenDrinking.indd 279 22/11/2013 11:02 280 Women drinking out in Britain Women’s drinking habits were revolutionized in the last quarter of the twentieth century, creating an entirely new subculture of drinking (Table 7).5 As then Publican editor Caroline Nodder recalled about the mid-1970s, ‘There were no alcopops. No gastropubs. No table service. No health and safety risk assessments. No lager louts. No

in Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century
A lesbian history of post-war Britain 1945–71

This book examines the ways in which women were able to deploy ambiguous concepts such as the 'career woman' and the 'bachelor girl' to simultaneously indicate and mask a lesbian identity. Contemporary anxieties about female same-sex desire which attached to these figures offered the opportunity to deploy them as an indication of potential sexual deviance. But their very ambiguity simultaneously afforded a protection from censure which more explicit terms such as 'lesbian' did not. These cultural connections between 'deviant' and 'normative' models of sexual identity have become the focus of considerable attention by queer theorists and historians in recent years. Queer historians have sought to analyse the institutional practices and discourses which produce sexual knowledge, and the ways in which these organise social life. They have concentrated their research on the binary opposition of homosexuality and heterosexuality as the dominant epistemological framework of knowledge about sexuality. The book seeks to explore the connections between space and cultural practices in lesbian history and is therefore concerned with the material world of post-war Britain. Identities such as 'tomboy' were invested with specific meanings in particular spatial contexts. As a child in rural Essex in the early 1950s, Nina Jenkins could use the term 'tomboy' to explain and excuse her desire to climb trees and be part of a boys' street gang.

Abstract only
Rebecca Jennings

the expense of considerations of materiality. Identities are invested with meaning and deployed in the material world and recent scholarship has therefore drawn attention to the impact of space and the material environment on the construction and performance of cultural practices. In the field of the history of sexuality, gay male subcultures have thus emerged as the focus of considerable scholarly attention. Building on earlier histories, which linked the emergence of a male homosexual subculture with the development of commercial leisure venues in a capitalist

in Tomboys and bachelor girls
Abstract only
Diplomacy transformed?
Jennifer Mori

Conclusion: Diplomacy transformed? In 1830, British diplomacy was still an occupational sub-culture of genteel public service rather than anything resembling a professional bureaucracy. Like other branches of the European foreign service, it would remain the preserve of the landed and wealthy throughout the nineteenth century.1 Having said this, the British corps had changed in its mentalities over the second half of the eighteenth century in response to new domestic expectations of public service and private identity. What it meant to be British was thereby

in The culture of diplomacy
David W. Gutzke

5 The more things change, the more (some) things remain the same B y the mid-1980s Smith’s typology of pubs was already being modified, with those upholding the traditional culture of drinking steadily contracting as manufacturing jobs disappeared, service industries replaced them and more women joined the labour market, often in part-time, low-paid jobs. Violence still marked the subculture of rough working-class pubs, but bouncers now acted as a deterrent, forcing aggression out of doors into the streets. Youths with pride, as in Newcastle, perpetuated the

in Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century