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Life in a religious subculture after the Agreement
Gladys Ganiel and Claire Mitchell

the Free Presbyterian Church, has dominated public perceptions of evangelicalism, it is in fact a much more diverse and politically varied group than is usually supposed (Mitchell and Ganiel, 2011 ). In this chapter, we develop our concept of an evangelical subculture in order to explore how both the politics of the post-Agreement period, as well as more mundane, everyday

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
The impact of devolution and cross-border cooperation

This book examines how the conflict affects people's daily behaviour in reinforcing sectarian or ghettoised notions and norms. It also examines whether and to what extent everyday life became normalised in the decade after the 1998 Good Friday Agreement (GFA). Cross-border commerce has been the stuff of everyday life ever since the partition of Ireland back in 1921. The book outlines how sectarianism and segregation are sustained and extended through the routine and mundane decisions that people make in their everyday lives. It explores the role of integrated education in breaking down residual sectarianism in Northern Ireland. The book examines the potential of the non-statutory Shared Education Programme (SEP) for fostering greater and more meaningful contact between pupils across the ethno-religious divide. It then focuses on women's involvement or women's marginalisation in society and politics. In considering women's political participation post-devolution, mention should be made of activities in the women's sector which created momentum for women's participation prior to the GFA. The book deals with the roles of those outside formal politics who engage in peace-making and everyday politics. It explores the fate of the Northern Irish Civic Forum and the role of section 75 of the 1998 Northern Ireland Act in creating more inclusive policy-making. Finally, the book explains how cross-border trade, shopping and economic development more generally, also employment and access to health services, affect how people navigate ethno-national differences; and how people cope with and seek to move beyond working-class isolation and social segregation.

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Same city but a different place?
Madeleine Leonard

boundaries and practices of exclusion and inclusion based on generation and teen subcultures. At the same time, when young people from interface areas visit city-centre spaces, ethno-national identities often simmer beneath the surface. General impressions of Belfast It is worth starting this chapter by drawing on some of the essays that the young people produced on the good

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Madeleine Leonard

, we did not want to position young people as belonging to a homogeneous Catholic or Protestant group, nor to reduce their varying identities to this single lens. Conversations with the Youth Forum suggested a more complex range of identities, including teen subcultures. Therefore we also included two images of young people as skateboarders (young people who perform stunts on skateboards, usually in

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
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Tim Aistrope

, terrorism springs from … subcultures of conspiracy and misinformation. Terrorists recruit most effectively from populations whose information about the world is contaminated by falsehoods and corrupted by conspiracy theories. The distortions keep alive grievances and filter out facts that would challenge popular prejudices and self-serving propaganda. 8

in Conspiracy theory and American foreign policy
"On the political passions in Europe and America and their implications for Transatlantic History"
Charles S. Maier

that socialism had little chance in America: it foundered on the reefs of prosperity. In the 1960s, American historians on the Left excavated the history of socialism and found that in areas such as Milwaukee or among the New York working classes (especially the Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe) there were strong socialist subcultures, and that only the First World War and the subsequent Red Scare had suppressed them. But even the 1912 vote for Eugene Debs in the presidential race and for the American Socialist Party in general amounted to only a small fraction

in The TransAtlantic reconsidered
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Tim Aistrope

terror. Sub-cultures of conspiracy and misinformation. Terrorists recruit most effectively from populations whose information about the world is contaminated by falsehoods and corrupted by conspiracy theories. The distortions keep alive grievances and filter out facts that would challenge popular prejudices and self-serving propaganda. An ideology that justifies murder. Terrorism ultimately

in Conspiracy theory and American foreign policy
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The politics of everyday life
Cillian McGrattan and Elizabeth Meehan

Ireland, while also exhibiting elements of a distinct subculture. Evangelicals’ perceptions of change demonstrate specific points about identity change in the years after the signing of the Agreement, and Ganiel and Mitchell raise important points about what changes have occurred and what they mean in wider political terms. For instance, they point out that the ‘high level’ changes

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Robin Wilson

organisations in the ‘peace process’ without their leaders having to embrace universal norms. This came at the expense of a corrosive gap between the ‘official rhetoric of transition’ (Bean, 2007 : 92) and the continued paramilitary sub-culture in working-class neighbourhoods – a gap which it took the McCartney sisters’ campaign to bridge. As Cunningham (2001: 156) recognises, ‘the

in The Northern Ireland experience of conflict and agreement
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Robin Wilson

drive for consociation, premised on ‘the stability of the subcultures’, even in the absence of favourable social conditions – with the only alternative deemed ‘another partition’ ( ibid . : 115, 131). Rick Wilford (1992: 34–5) not only found consociationalism normatively unattractive but argued that a wiser reaction to the 1974 debacle (see Chapter 4 ) would be to

in The Northern Ireland experience of conflict and agreement