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Chiharu Yoshioka

The Gothic is the discourse which embodies the dialectic of the Enlightenment, with its potential to push the frontier of reason into the mythologized darkness. Embarking on the use of genre fiction as political discourse and finding a voice to tell a story of her generation, Carter made a major breakthrough in her career. Making use of the Gothic palimpsest, Carters Marianne leaves behind the sphere of (feminine) ‘interiority’-the psychic spaces of desire and anxiety for the (supposedly masculine) catharsis in the Other world, as a sixties heroine of sensibility. Heroes and Villains calls for the reconstruction of enlightenment at the ‘post-modern’ ruins of civilization.

Gothic Studies
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Laurence Coupe

Coupe 06 22/3/07 01:14 Page 207 Postscript I trust that, as this study comes to a close, readers will feel able to concur with me that, once one has recognised the ‘Beat’ vision as the ‘beatific’ vision, the relationship between the fifties writers and the sixties songwriters becomes rather more intriguing than it would be if we relied on some vague notion of a bohemian legacy. Once one takes Beats such as Kerouac, Ginsberg and Snyder seriously as religious writers, exploring possibilities of spirituality with a view to mystical revelation, the achievement

in Beat sound, Beat vision
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Claire Hines

This is a remark that Playboy has revisited over the years to underline the strength of its association with the Bond character; it would also suggest that Fleming himself understood the potential of the bond between them early on. Among other things that James Bond and Playboy have in common is the fact that they are both strongly associated with the sixties, having launched at about the same time in 1953, and remarkably they are still around over sixty years later. During the 1960s in particular, the print and screen versions of Bond made frequent appearances in

in The playboy and James Bond
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Claire Hines

6 The bond beyond Since the November 1965 issue, Playboy magazine has maintained some strong connections to James Bond, albeit in changing cultural circumstances. Though the social and cultural landscape of Britain and America has changed dramatically since the sixties, the use of the Bond and Playboy formulas has largely endured, and for the most part the relations established between them continue over fifty years later. However, this does not mean there have not been some necessary adjustments, especially since critics and commentators have long speculated

in The playboy and James Bond
007, Ian Fleming and Playboy magazine
Author: Claire Hines

The Playboy magazine has always reminded its readership of the Playboy-Bond connection by commenting on its longevity and significance, especially in relation to times past. Among other things that James Bond and Playboy have in common is the fact that they are both strongly associated with the sixties. They were launched at about the same time in 1953, and are still around. This book is primarily organised around the story of the relationship between them, played out in popular culture as part of wider cultural relations. Though the chapters outline the emergence of the Playboy-Bond relationship, they also draw on relevant historical and theoretical concerns. The research presented focuses on the public version of the Playboy-Bond relationship as mediated by Bond and Playboy magazine and evident within the shifting realms of culture and the media. It also discusses how the close relationship between Ian Fleming and Playboy was publicised in print with some form of commentary. How Fleming and the Bond novels endorsed Playboy, and how Playboy endorsed Ian Fleming and Bond novels, against the backdrop of American popular culture, is discussed. After discussing Connery's Bond, the book presents some illustrative examples of this connection, especially in terms of consumer preferences, style and taste. It draws together arguments on male fantasy of 'strategic and selective "liberation" of women in order to discuss the women in Bond and Playboy. Finally, the book considers how the two remain interconnected, and as long-standing cultural icons representing the playboy lifestyle fantasy.

Youth, pop and the rise of Madchester
Author: Steve Redhead

Madchester may have been born at the Haçienda in the summer of 1988, but the city had been in creative ferment for almost a decade prior to the rise of Acid House. The End-of-the-Century Party is the definitive account of a generational shift in popular music and youth culture, what it meant and what it led to. First published right after the Second Summer of Love, it tells the story of the transition from New Pop to the Political Pop of the mid-1980s and its deviant offspring, Post-Political Pop. Resisting contemporary proclamations about the end of youth culture and the rise of a new, right-leaning conformism, the book draws on interviews with DJs, record company bosses, musicians, producers and fans to outline a clear transition in pop thinking, a move from an obsession with style, packaging and synthetic sounds to content, socially conscious lyrics and a new authenticity.

This edition is framed by a prologue by Tara Brabazon, which asks how we can reclaim the spirit, energy and authenticity of Madchester for a post-youth, post-pop generation. It is illustrated with iconic photographs by Kevin Cummins.

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Martin O’Shaughnessy

Introduction Laurent Cantet is one of France’s leading contemporary directors although he has only made a relatively modest number of films. If the undoubted high point of his career to date was the award of the Palme d’Or at the sixty-first Cannes film festival in 2008 to his Entre les murs (The Class), it was not his first critical success. It came on the back of the Don Quixote award given to L’Emploi du temps (Time Out) at the Venice film festival in 2001, the French César for best first film and other prizes given to Ressources humaines (Human Resources

in Laurent Cantet
Whatever happened to the new bohemia?
Steve Redhead

1960s is deeply ambiguous. It is not, Hewison argues, that the era was merely ‘better’, but that: The Sixties were good at a number of things, especially at having a good time, and now, when we are having a bad time, we are inclined to read the words ‘too much’ with a guilty awareness that the rich substance of the Sixties has been dissipated in the Eighties –​and that it was in the Seventies that we began to pay the price. Of course, it is much more complicated than that, and at this distance from events there is still confusion about what took place, as well as

in The end-of-the-century party
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Sam Rohdie

story as the sixty-nine images by the side of the narratives. When Dude in Rio Bravo crawls on the ground to pick out the silver dollar that Burdett had tauntingly thrown into a spitoon at the very beginning of the film, it is as if the movement forward of the story hesitates for an instant at his gesture, intensifying it and the slime of the dollar in the spitoon, then resumes its path taking Dude

in Montage
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Laurence Coupe

, a dialectic at work: the sacred, while transcending the profane, can only reveal itself within the profane; again, unless there were a mode of experience deemed profane, the need to apprehend the sacred would make no sense. I would suggest that the Beat writers and the sixties songwriters whom we will be discussing may be seen as attempting to provide manifestations of the sacred. More Coupe 00 22/3/07 4 01:04 Page 4 Beat sound, Beat vision particularly, the Beat impulse is to transform profane time into sacred time, and to transform profane space into

in Beat sound, Beat vision