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David Geiringer

shown that religious impetuses informed the early development of sexological theories at the turn of the twentieth century; Laura Ramsay has demonstrated that actors within the Church of England played a formative role in bringing about the ‘permissive’ legislation of the sixties; and Sam Brewitt-Taylor has emphasised the centrality of clergymen to the ‘myth of the sexual revolution’ in the same decade

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

as a time of prosperity and social cohesion stand in marked contrast to the popular tales of social change and generational dissonance of the 1960s. Arthur Marwick’s influential tome The Sixties: Cultural Revolution in Britain, France, Italy, and the United States, c. 1958–c.1974 (1998) argues that: [M]inor and rather insignificant movements in the fifties became major and highly significant ones in the sixties; that intangible ideas in the fifties became powerful practicalities in the sixties; that the sixties were characterised by the vast number of

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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David Geiringer

and the Demographic Revolution: Women and Secularisation in Canada, Ireland, UK and USA since the 1960s ( Woodbridge , 2012 ); A. Marwick, The Sixties: Cultural Revolution in Britain, France, Italy, and the United States, c. 1958–c. 1974 (Oxford, 1998), p. 36 21 Marwick, The Sixties , pp. 288–358; G

in The Pope and the pill
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Carmen Mangion

), p. 182 . 9 Sarah F. Browne , ‘ Women, Religion, and the Turn to Feminism: Experiences of Women’s Liberation Activists in Britain in the Seventies ’, in Nancy Christie and Michael Gavreau (eds), The Sixties and Beyond: Dechristianisation in North America and Western Europe, 1945–2000 ( Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2013 ), pp. 84 – 97 . An American version of this is: Liesl Schwabe , ‘ Everything I Know about Feminism I Learned from Nuns ’, New York Times (16 February 2019 ). www.nytimes.com/2019/02/16/opinion

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

, ‘ “When Did the Sixties Happen?” Searching for New Directions ’, Journal of Social History , 33 ( 1999 ), 147 . For example, see Horn, The Spirit of ’68 . 6 Bruno Bonomo , ‘ Presa della parola: A Review and Discussion of Oral History and the Italian 1968 ’, Memory Studies , 6 ( 2013 ), 7 – 22 . 7 Nick Thomas , ‘ Challenging Myths of the 1960s: The Case of Student Protest in Britain ’, Twentieth Century British History , 13 ( 2002 ), 293 8 Caroline M. Hoefferle , British Student Activism in the Long Sixties ( Abingdon : Routledge

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
David Geiringer

traditional historiography of thesixties’, epitomised by the work of Arthur Marwick and Christie Davies, would later reinforce this story of shifting power dynamics. Indeed, Marwick was to identify the Catholic Church as the archetypal antagonist in his account of sixties liberation, describing it as being ‘in opposition to all the great movements aiming towards greater freedom for ordinary human beings in

in The Pope and the pill
David Geiringer

. The second section of the chapter reconstructs the moments within which these changes in personal identity occurred. The interviewees’ testimony placed a particular emphasis on the experiential when recalling changes in contraceptive practice and sexual behaviour. They were often eager to downplay the role of the new ideologies and texts they came across in the sixties, and stressed instead the

in The Pope and the pill
David Geiringer

Discourse on the “Good Woman” in 1950s and 1960s Britain ’, in N. Christie and M. Gauvreau (eds), The Sixties and Beyond: Dechristianization in North America and Western Europe, 1945–2000 ( Toronto , 2013 ), pp. 60 – 83 . 90 Ibid., p. 69

in The Pope and the pill
Carmen Mangion

SSH ENW: 1970 Provincial Chapter II, Batch 3, Sister Honor Basset, ‘Summary of the Assessments of Experiments Made in This Province’ (March 1970), p. 2. 114 Lynn Abrams , ‘ Mothers and Daughters: Negotiating the Discourse on the “Good Woman” in 1950s and 1960s Britain ’, in Nancy Christie and Michael Gavreau (eds), The Sixties and Beyond: Dechristianisation in North America and Western Europe, 1945–2000 ( Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2013 ), pp. 69 – 70 . 115 Betty Jerman , The Lively-Minded Women: The First Twenty Years of the

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age