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A lived religious history of English Catholicism, 1945–82
Author: Alana Harris

Drawing upon a multi-disciplinary methodology employing diverse written sources, material practices and vivid life histories, Faith in the Family seeks to assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council on the ordinary believer, alongside contemporaneous shifts in British society relating to social mobility, the sixties, sexual morality, and secularisation. Chapters examine the changes in the Roman Catholic liturgy and Christology, devotion to Mary, the rosary and the place of women in the family and church, as well as the enduring (but shifting) popularity of Saints Bernadette and Thérèse.

Appealing to students of modern British gender and cultural history, as well as a general readership interested in religious life in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century, Faith in the Family illustrates that despite unmistakable differences in their cultural accoutrements and interpretations of Catholicism, English Catholics continued to identify with and practise the ‘Faith of Our Fathers’ before and after Vatican II.

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A Vatican rag
Alana Harris

Catholic family as an interpretative metaphor and a subjective actuality. This chapter commences with a short, partial, but essential introduction to the Second Vatican Council, and then outlines the methodologies and sources to be employed throughout this study, foregrounding the lived religious experiences of Catholics before and after the Council, and situating these discussions within broader debates in the mainstream twentieth-century historiography about secularisation, the sixties, and shifting gendered identities. * The Second Vatican Council, the twenty

in Faith in the family
Rothenburg, 1561–1652
Author: Alison Rowlands

Given the widespread belief in witchcraft and the existence of laws against such practices, why did witch-trials fail to gain momentum and escalate into ‘witch-crazes’ in certain parts of early modern Europe? This book answers this question by examining the rich legal records of the German city of Rothenburg ob der Tauber, a city that experienced a very restrained pattern of witch-trials and just one execution for witchcraft between 1561 and 1652. The book explores the factors that explain the absence of a ‘witch-craze’ in Rothenburg, placing particular emphasis on the interaction of elite and popular priorities in the pursuit (and non-pursuit) of alleged witches at law. By making the witchcraft narratives told by the peasants and townspeople of Rothenburg central to its analysis, the book also explores the social and psychological conflicts that lay behind the making of accusations and confessions of witchcraft. Furthermore, it challenges the existing explanations for the gender-bias of witch-trials, and also offers insights into other areas of early modern life, such as experiences of and beliefs about communal conflict, magic, motherhood, childhood and illness. Written in a narrative style, the study invites a wide readership to share in the drama of early modern witch trials.

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David Geiringer

shown that religious impetuses informed the early development of sexological theories at the turn of the twentieth century; Laura Ramsay has demonstrated that actors within the Church of England played a formative role in bringing about the ‘permissive’ legislation of the sixties; and Sam Brewitt-Taylor has emphasised the centrality of clergymen to the ‘myth of the sexual revolution’ in the same decade

in The Pope and the pill
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Carmen Mangion

as a time of prosperity and social cohesion stand in marked contrast to the popular tales of social change and generational dissonance of the 1960s. Arthur Marwick’s influential tome The Sixties: Cultural Revolution in Britain, France, Italy, and the United States, c. 1958–c.1974 (1998) argues that: [M]inor and rather insignificant movements in the fifties became major and highly significant ones in the sixties; that intangible ideas in the fifties became powerful practicalities in the sixties; that the sixties were characterised by the vast number of

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
David Geiringer

and the Demographic Revolution: Women and Secularisation in Canada, Ireland, UK and USA since the 1960s ( Woodbridge , 2012 ); A. Marwick, The Sixties: Cultural Revolution in Britain, France, Italy, and the United States, c. 1958–c. 1974 (Oxford, 1998), p. 36 21 Marwick, The Sixties , pp. 288–358; G

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

), p. 182 . 9 Sarah F. Browne , ‘ Women, Religion, and the Turn to Feminism: Experiences of Women’s Liberation Activists in Britain in the Seventies ’, in Nancy Christie and Michael Gavreau (eds), The Sixties and Beyond: Dechristianisation in North America and Western Europe, 1945–2000 ( Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2013 ), pp. 84 – 97 . An American version of this is: Liesl Schwabe , ‘ Everything I Know about Feminism I Learned from Nuns ’, New York Times (16 February 2019 ). www.nytimes.com/2019/02/16/opinion

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

, ‘ “When Did the Sixties Happen?” Searching for New Directions ’, Journal of Social History , 33 ( 1999 ), 147 . For example, see Horn, The Spirit of ’68 . 6 Bruno Bonomo , ‘ Presa della parola: A Review and Discussion of Oral History and the Italian 1968 ’, Memory Studies , 6 ( 2013 ), 7 – 22 . 7 Nick Thomas , ‘ Challenging Myths of the 1960s: The Case of Student Protest in Britain ’, Twentieth Century British History , 13 ( 2002 ), 293 8 Caroline M. Hoefferle , British Student Activism in the Long Sixties ( Abingdon : Routledge

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
William Sancroft and the later Stuart Church
Grant Tapsell

Chapter 11 . The reluctant chaplain: William Sancroft and the later Stuart Church Grant Tapsell W illiam Sancroft cannot have looked back fondly on the events of 17 October 1686. That day featured the consecration of Thomas Cartwright, a man he did not respect and whose promotion he had lobbied against, as Bishop of Chester. To add injury to insult we learn from Cartwright’s diary that the sixty-nine-year-old primate ‘fell flat on his face as he passed with the Holy Bread from the south to the north side of the altar, his head to the place where he knelt; but

in Chaplains in early modern England
David Geiringer

traditional historiography of thesixties’, epitomised by the work of Arthur Marwick and Christie Davies, would later reinforce this story of shifting power dynamics. Indeed, Marwick was to identify the Catholic Church as the archetypal antagonist in his account of sixties liberation, describing it as being ‘in opposition to all the great movements aiming towards greater freedom for ordinary human beings in

in The Pope and the pill