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Coriolanus from the seventeenth to the twentieth century
Robert Ormsby

feelings for his family in performances during the middle of the nineteenth century (Ripley 164, 181). The tremendous talents of the sixty-three-year-old Irving and his Volumnia, Ellen Terry, meanwhile, were ostensibly ill-suited to the tasks they had set themselves in staging the play at the Lyceum Theatre, where the production was retired at the end of the season (Ripley 184, 198). Although there were

in Coriolanus
Robert Ormsby

RSC stages between 1975 and 1978, Hands was largely responsible for this style at the time. Sally Beauman remarks that during the company’s second decade there was a shift from the company’s ostensibly political ‘epic style of the Sixties’ to an emphasis on ‘the complexity of personal and family relationships’ (329). In contrast to the ‘balance, weight, [and] rationality’ of the company’s earlier

in Coriolanus
Abigail Shinn

), but it is probably safe to assume that it is unlikely that a female convert would be employed as a sailor or confess to spending her time drinking, smoking, and gambling. Out of the sixty-one narratives in the Experiences , however, only four describe specifically masculine pursuits or occupations, the stories of T. R., H. N., T. G., and the ‘souldier’ S. P

in Conversions
Old and new
Margaret Christian

“the founder of the universe, the Governor of the whole world, the Fashioner of humanity, the Sower of universal nations.”10 Few interpreters followed up on Clement’s and Tertullian’s universalism, however. Resonating better with later writers was Clement’s idea that the parable supported a teaching that there would be “Degrees of Glory in Heaven”: there are various abodes, according to the worth of those who have believed … These chosen abodes, which are three, are indicated by the numbers in the Gospel – the thirty, the sixty, the hundred. And the perfect

in Spenserian allegory and Elizabethan biblical exegesis
Paul Edmondson

before they were a month old, and 9 per cent within a week of their birth (Jones, 1996 : 93. Unless otherwise stated, all statistics cited from Jeanne Jones’s book should be understood to refer to the sixty-year period from 1570 to 1630.) When he was fifteen, Shakespeare may have attended the funeral of his seven-and-a-half-year-old sister, Anne. John Shakespeare paid 8d to have

in Finding Shakespeare’s New Place
Modern language learning in Elizabethan England
Jason Lawrence

clearly displays Drummond’s interest in modern languages: over twenty per cent of the 546 titles are printed in French, and a further eleven per cent are in Italian. 73 It also suggests that he begins to collect books seriously on his visit to London and France between 1606 and 1608: of the sixty or so Italian titles in his 1611 library, eighteen are purchased by Drummond in London, a further

in ‘Who the devil taught thee so much Italian?’
Lord Rochester andRestoration modernity
Matthew C. Augustine

Rochester, Poems on Several Occasions by the Right Honourable, the E. of R— , was issued just a few weeks after his death in 1680 under a false Antwerp imprint. 31 Of the sixty-one poems therein contained, approximately half were not by Rochester. This volume is nevertheless the most reliable of all the early editions, for 1680 , as Vieth showed, derives from a carefully and knowledgably curated anthology of court-libertine verse which survives in a collateral copy produced by the same scriptorium (Yale MS Osborn b. 105, the ‘Hansen’ miscellany). 32 In other words

in Aesthetics of contingency
Religion, revolution, and the end of history in Dryden’s late works
Matthew C. Augustine

Sebastian was allied were demolished at Alcazarquivir, leaving Portugal weak and without an heir to the throne. The ensuing dynastic struggles resulted in the crowning of Philip II of Spain as king of Portugal in 1581 and the establishment of the Iberian Union. In the sixty or so years of the Union, from 1581 to 1640, no less than four men appeared claiming to be the lost Sebastian and challenging the legitimacy of Spanish rule of Portugal. Don Sebastian thus became a popular figure of ballads and romances, O Encoberto (‘The Hidden One’) who would return to redeem

in Aesthetics of contingency
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Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare: Methodological Investigations
J. B. Lethbridge

incompatible’ (362). The paper is impressionistic, as perhaps such discussions require to be; but there are many useful observations, some adroit practical criticism, and it is well-worth turning to; even while one may feel that in the sixty-year interim, much of what Mayhall says of Shakespeare we would say of Spenser now. But what ever the differences, the potential incompatibilities

in Shakespeare and Spenser
Samuel Daniel and the naturalisation of Italian literary forms
Jason Lawrence

Italian source, Antonio Tebaldeo’s ‘A che presti, superba, a un vetro fede?’. Similarly, ‘I once may see when yeeres shall wrecke my wronge’ is based on the sixty-third sonnet of Cléonice (1583), rather than the Italian original by Tasso. Daniel does, however, later discover Desportes’ immediate source in Italy, and adds imitations of the two following sonnets in Tasso’s Rime to the authorised

in ‘Who the devil taught thee so much Italian?’