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Sara Upstone

1 Salman Rushdie and V. S. Naipaul Diaspora that we were, we became static and in this stasis relapsed into mythology, initially through epic remembrance of the Indian past and subsequently through Bombay cinema. Nor did our lives in the end find an alternative vitality through the postcolonial celebration of the hybrid; rather we remained half and half. 1 Visit the University of London Library located at Senate House, Bloomsbury, and the problem of classifying authors by ethnicity becomes immediately apparent. A researcher wanting to consult work on Salman

in British Asian fiction
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Sara Upstone

Zadie Smith’s White Teeth (2000) or Marion Molteno’s ‘In Her Mother’s House’ (1987), which are not written by authors of BritishAsian ethnicity, but nevertheless address issues related to this cultural background.54 The book is structured to trace a chronology, though not necessarily a linear development. Chapter 1 explores the transition between migrant and British-born/ raised positioning through the figures of V. S. Naipaul and Salman Rushdie, arguing that the common reading of their liminal positioning can be reconsidered to emphasise the transition from migrant

in British Asian fiction
Ruvani Ranasinha

That summer of 2010, waiting for a flight, Kureishi noticed the woman seated next to him en route to the same event in Istanbul reading a P.G. Wodehouse novel. Amused, he held up his own Jeeves and Wooster to the imperious Lady Nadira Naipaul. Lively discussions over their cherished Wodehouse heightened their rapport. He had known Nadira, who was just a year older than him, since 1996, when at 43 she had married 64-year-old V.S. Naipaul, who went on to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001. The Naipauls, Stephen Frears and Kureishi

in Hanif Kureishi
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Ruvani Ranasinha

increased. Mosques were attacked. Fearmongering – and laments about ‘normal’ Muslims doing nothing to stop jihadist actions – saturated the media and generated debates about Islam and British Muslims’ incompatibility with modern, liberal values. Assessments put forward by writers from V.S. Naipaul to Christopher Hitchens of ‘the Muslim’ as anti-rational, anti-modern, accelerated and intensified. In 2001 Naipaul claimed the effects of Islam were ‘worse’ than colonialism. 4 Once again, Islamic faith became synonymous with

in Hanif Kureishi
Ruvani Ranasinha

author of fiction . As my book South Asian Writers in Twentieth-Century Britain shows, the demarcation of the role of writers of colour as native informants constrained to non - fiction has a long history in white-dominated publishing. The situation was especially difficult for mid-century South Asian anglophone fictional writers. There was no equivalent of the pioneering BBC Radio programme Caribbean Voices that provided a platform, financial reward and critical appraisal for fledgling Caribbean novelists Sam Selvon, V.S. Naipaul and George Lamming. In any

in Hanif Kureishi
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Ruvani Ranasinha

. Six months after Shanoo's death, ‘perhaps still on the look-out for fathers’ and literary mentors, he wrote to V.S. Naipaul ( MEAHH 169). Soon afterwards he visited the Salisbury home that the older writer shared with his wife Pat. As Patrick French observes in his biography of Naipaul, his subject gave ‘unexpected hospitality to Hanif Kureishi’ in June 1992. Over cake and Indian champagne, the younger author received advice on writing and how to look after his bad back. 54 Afterwards in his typed thank you letter

in Hanif Kureishi
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End of empire and the English novel
Bill Schwarz

, with decolonisation his urgent concern, they ‘didn’t interest me very much’. He was drawn instead to the French: to Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir and Albert Camus. It was they, he argues, who enabled him to bring together politics and letters and who, more particularly, understood the historical significance of the ending of the epoch of the European colonial powers.15 This sense of the parochialism of England is about all that Lamming has ever shared with V.S. Naipaul, who came to believe that his arrival at Oxford University in 1950, due to ill

in End of empire and the English novel since 1945
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Nature and spirit
David Punter

fear, that they do not relate to the inevitable return; and so we are reduced again to slash-and-burn or, in V. S. Naipaul’s inimitable and more upto-date term, ‘insuranburn’. 31 Can you insure against the exiled dead? Well, perhaps you can, but only if you know what they are, which would seem difficult under the conditions of a dark, mostly blinded revelation such as

in Ecogothic
Abigail Ward

which Dabydeen uses creole language, tracing its potential for decolonisation or subversion. The focus for Macedo and Karran’s book is on the multiple ‘points of connection’ in Dabydeen’s work, specifically exploring how he – and by extension his writing – may be thought of as being located between multiple identifications. 12 Essays range from an examination of masculinity and creole in Slave Song to his intertextual relationship with V. S. Naipaul, and three are concerned with his long poem ‘Turner’. Aleid Fokkema reads the poem in

in Caryl Phillips, David Dabydeen and Fred D’Aguiar
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Sara Upstone

The novel has more in common with the lads’ fiction of Tony Parsons and Nick Hornby than the work of Rushdie or V. S. Naipaul. Govinden’s teenage protagonists in Graffiti My Soul are equally confident, rejecting racist slogans as the language of ‘the 1980s’.2 Malkani’s Londonstani is dominated by hypermasculine bravado, centred on characters who feel no need to reclaim Britain because they already own at least some part of it: there is, here, ‘no kind of confused roots issue’.3 Yet, at the same time, the conclusion marked here is a kind of ending. Comparing these

in British Asian fiction