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Emma Liggins

independence, testifies to this coveted respectability. The widow’s subversiveness is however always in tension with, and regulated by, her motherhood. The realm of the ‘post-marital’ (and potentially ‘post-maternal’), realised in the 1930s novels of Vita Sackville-West, provides a particularly resonant challenge to the authority of the heterosexual plot. Whilst the First World War precipitated the breakdown of mourning traditions, as women’s war work partly put a stop to the periods of seclusion demanded by the old etiquette of mourning,15 it is surprising that the war

in Odd women?
The Actresses’ Franchise League from 1914 to 1928
Naomi Paxton

in formation from Charing Cross to Hyde Park.61 The press had not forgotten the League’s role in demonstrations before 1914: The procession took … a route full of memories for the veterans … the Actresses’ Franchise League … remembering that since they marched in the last great procession they had set going the schemes of service that led to the wide development and organization of women’s war work.62 A year later, the AFL was a signatory to a letter from Lady Rhondda – who had first petitioned in 192063 for the right to take her place as a hereditary peer in the

in Stage women, 1900–50
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Naomi Paxton

when the meeting began in Hyde Park to champion ‘the cause of the professional woman under 30, who had not only qualified for a profession, but was frequently married as well, with husband, children, and home to manage’.157 The Manchester Guardian recognised the League, ‘remembering that since they marched in the last great procession they had set going the schemes of service that led to the wide development and organisation of women’s war work’.158 A year later, the League was signatory to a letter from Lady Rhondda –​who had first petitioned in 1920 for the right

in Stage Rights!
Emma Liggins

Brittain, who worked as a nurse, concurred that ‘already the free-and-easy movements of girl war-workers had begun to modify convention’.28 In Ray Strachey’s 1928 history of feminist heroism, ‘the great success of women’s war work, and the great publicity which attended it’ led directly to ‘suffrage victory’.29 Inter-war women’s autobiographies, the war and suffrage agitation In one of the closing and most important chapters of her feminist autobiography Life Errant (1935), entitled ‘The State of Single 124 Odd women? Blessedness: and Matters Arising Therefrom

in Odd women?
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Jana Funke

war before returning to England, marrying a second 32 ‘The World’ and other unpublished works husband and giving birth to a son.93 This indicates that Hall did not necessarily associate women’s war work with same-sex desire or with the affirmation of lesbian identity (although she would choose to present this particular narrative in The Well of Loneliness). Thus, it is vital to acknowledge the open-endedness of Hall’s writings, which often reflect the more general indeterminacy of representations of gender and sexuality in the interwar period. Hall’s decision to

in ‘The World’ and other unpublished works of Radclyffe Hall