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Louise Amoore

). There is an underlying assumption that welfare and active labour market policies must be limited in order that there may be no disincentives to take on ‘flexible’ work: ‘To ensure that most participants are poor and to maintain incentives for workers to move on to regular work when it becomes available, programs should pay no more than the average wage for unskilled labor’ (World Bank, 2001: 156). This example, drawn from the World Bank’s ‘principles of successful workfare programmes’, demonstrates the market-centred logic of the flexibility discourse. Taken to its

in Globalisation contested
The restructuring of work in Germany
Louise Amoore

state-societies (Giddens, 1998). Gerhard Schröder’s apparent embracing of the individualism and ‘workfare’ (Jessop, 1994) strategy of Blair’s ‘Third Way’ in his ‘Neue Mitte’ concept may be read as indicative of an acceptance of the necessary restructuring imperatives of a global economy. Yet, when we explore the debate taking place within and outside German state-society it becomes clear that the representation of Germany as a rigid and inflexible political economy in need of radical restructuring is by no means uncontested. An effective counter to neo-liberal claims

in Globalisation contested