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Abstract only
Kimberly Hutchings

narratives of apocalypse and redemption. For both Virilio and Agamben, though for rather different reasons, time as both chronos and kairos permits very little room for worldly hope. [ 131 ] 3200TimeandWorldPolitics.qxd:2935 The Biopolitics 18/7/08 07:57 Page 132 Diagnosing the times The world on speed Space/time/end Fukuyama is entirely wrong: it’s not the end of history, but the end of a regime of historical temporality. (Virilio, 1997a: 185) Virilio’s diagnosis of the present as the time of ‘globalitarianism’ overlaps with a range of other readings of the

in Time and world politics
Neal Curtis

to achieve a ‘superior finality’, or sovereign completion in the face of apocalypse is precisely what threatens to bring the apocalypse about. Although superhero comics regularly partake in this projection of the bad infinite there are plenty of stories that explicitly treat the threat of apocalypse and the ‘necessary’ violence it supposedly demands as an explicit theme. This can be seen in Mark Waid’s Kingdom Come, discussed in the introduction, but Alan Moore’s Watchmen is perhaps exemplary in this regard.9 This subject is primarily addressed through the male

in Sovereignty and superheroes
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Waiting for the Americans
Philip Cunliffe

whatever life might hand her next’, but also her ‘utterly unshakeable conviction that nothing serious could have happened to America, and that it was only a matter of holding out for a while until the Americans arrived to put everything in order’.1 The lethargy in the face of the apocalypse rests on the fantasy of American rescue: ‘Our suggestions that any surviving Americans would be likely to have their hands more than full at home was received as so much wet blanketry. The Americans, they assured us, would never have allowed such a thing to happen in their own country

in Cosmopolitan dystopia
Kimberly Hutchings

reconcile secular chronos with the kairotic time of creation and apocalypse described and prophesied in the Bible. In seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe, neo-classical and Christian temporal framings of human history interact and intersect with a Baconian faith in the possibilities of progress. They do so within a context in which the temporal and spatial distinctiveness of Europe is becoming a self- C [ 28 ] 3200TimeandWorldPolitics.qxd:2935 The Biopolitics 18/7/08 07:57 Page 29 From fortune to history conscious assumption of European thinkers, a context

in Time and world politics
British fiction and the EU
Lisa Bischoff

threats. 4 For the scholars of late antiquity and the early Middle Ages, Rome was the ‘natural successor to a sequence consisting of Alexander the Great, Persia, and Babylonia’ and thus the ‘fourth and final realm of civilisation outlined in the Book of Daniel whose existence was necessary for defence against the forces of the apparently imminent Apocalypse’ (Foster, 2015 : 45). In the course of the centuries, several other countries came to see themselves as the subsequent new, fifth empire (Foster, 2015 : 45). On Roman Empire and European Unification see also

in The road to Brexit
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Sovereignty and superheroes
Neal Curtis

potentially dangerous consequences of an uncompromising pursuit of order in the face of what we see as the forces of chaos. Introducing a problem I will return to at length in Chapter 7, the malevolent threat from super-villains that seemingly required the exercise of power without limits creates a situation in which the exercise of that power brings about the devastation against which it was supposed to guard. The story is also interwoven with biblical visions of apocalypse. Mark Waid has a preacher named Norman McCay recite passages from the Book of Revelations, while

in Sovereignty and superheroes
Cerwyn Moore

reality; there is really no war at all; it is a product of our morbid imagination, an external symbol in the struggle of the universal soul with the universal horror, the symbol of the struggle of our souls with the chimeras and hydras of chaos.30 This evocation of a morbid nightmare, an imaginary apocalyptic foe and thus a symbolic struggle echoes the reading of de-territorial technologised violence in the work of Der Derian. As if to mirror the threat to the Russian empire, the Watson Institute symposium demonstrated how apocalypse was used as a threat to the

in Contemporary violence
Constance Duncombe

land holds in the identity nexus of Native Americans, is obfuscated by the hegemonic understandings of the role land plays in the construction of US national identity. 62 Jon Stratton, ‘The beast of the apocalypse: The postcolonial experience of the United States’, in Postcolonial America , ed. C. Richard King (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2000), p. 26

in Representation, recognition and respect in world politics
Davide Rodogno

their exclusive prerogative. In Francis Ford Coppola’s movie Apocalypse Now , which gives an account of the war in Vietnam via Joseph Conrad’s novella Heart of Darkness , the protagonist, Colonel Kurtz, reflects on certainty. To be absolutely clear, and to avoid any superfluous criticism, I am not in any way, shape or form claiming that this fictional character’s moral universe has anything to do with humanitarians’ morality. Colonel Kurtz is the perfect antithesis of the humanitarian. In fact, it is precisely for this reason that I think a mise en parallèle is

in The Red Cross Movement
Paul Kingsnorth, John Berger and the pros and cons of a sense of place
Christian Schmitt-Kilb

combination with ecocritical, environmentalist concerns, presents them in the context of a pending apocalypse. Even though we know that we are doomed, says Kingsnorth, the ‘idea of history in which the future will be an upgraded version of the present’ (Kingsnorth and Hine, 2014 : 15) is still strong. The Wake A sense of place under threat in the context of imminent apocalypse provides the coordinates of The Wake . Buccmaster knows his place in the beginning (‘i had my land i cnawan my ham and my folcs i was a great man there’ [Kingsnorth, 2014 : 233]) until the

in The road to Brexit