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Lionel Laborie

been chosen by Christ himself to announce his return.11 Jesus allegedly appeared to Barbara Cadell in London in 1694.12 The Revd John Mason had the same vision in Water-Stratford; he believed the Millennium was to begin the same year and that he would live for another thousand years, while his two disciples, Thomas Ward and Valentine Evans, claimed to be the two witnesses of the Apocalypse (Revelation 11:3).13 Similarly, the Independent minister Thomas Beverley predicted the Second Coming for 1697, which the Origenist Thomas Moor(e) claimed to fulfil as the new

in Enlightening enthusiasm
Primitivism and the primitive Church
Robert G. Ingram

Chapter 12 The religion of the first ages: primitivism and the primitive Church I n September 1735, Matthias Symson visited the London bookseller George Strahan to gauge Strahan’s interest in publishing his friend Zachary Grey’s response to Isaac Newton’s Observations upon the prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St. John (1733). Strahan, owner of one of London’s largest printing houses, had no interest, explaining to Symson that ‘he did not care to meddle: it being an abstruse subject, he did not know how it would take’: he worried that Grey’s retort

in Reformation without end
Abstract only
Lionel Laborie

Visions: Experiencing Religion and Explaining Experience from Wesley to James (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999). 26 Warren Johnston, Revelation Restored:  The Apocalypse in Later Seventeenth-Century England (Woodbridge and Rochester, NY:  Boydell Press, 2011). 27 Anon., ‘The Last Seven Shakers in the World’, The Economist (13–19 February 1999), 61. Stacey Chase, ‘The Last Ones Standing’, The Boston Globe (23 July 2006). Jane Harrigan, ‘New Hampshire’s Shaker History:  The Enduring Simplicity of the Shakers’, New Hampshire Magazine (October 2013), www

in Enlightening enthusiasm
Susan Royal

This lesson was perhaps laced with secrecy because in these meetings Tinker would foretell of the ‘day of dome’. 61 Similarly, John Ryburne met in a farmyard to prophesy ‘that a tyme shall come that no eleuation shall bee made’. 62 John Harrys and his friend Richard Colyns met together with their wives to talk of the Apocalypse, and Foxe reported that the Lyvord conventicle met to read a book of exposition on Revelation, where they ‘communed concernyng the matter of openyng the booke with seuen clapses [ sic ]’. 63 Instruction and learning

in Lollards in the English Reformation
Silent and betrayed
Patricia Casey

, National Geographic magazine, in its December 2015 issue, ran a front-​page story entitled, ‘Mary: The Most Powerful Woman in the World’. Meanwhile, a number of new atheist philosophers, and four in particular, have become known as the Four Horsemen of the Non-​Apocalypse, and their prominence has been obvious since the turn of the millennium. These are Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris and Christopher Hitchens. Many of today’s atheists do not accept that religion should be tolerated but argue that it should be countered and expunged from the public square

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Prodigies, miracles and providence
Robert G. Ingram

wary eye. Of Newton’s Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St John (1732), he reckoned that ‘tho’ [Newton] was a prodigy in His way, yet I never expected great things of this kind (which 312 The triumph of Christ over Julian requires a perfect knowledge of ancient literature, History and Mankind) from a man who spent all his days in looking through a Telescope’.65 Warburton approved more fully of Newton’s natural philosophical writings, which informed his understanding of divine action in the natural world.66 ‘And the immortal Theory of

in Reformation without end
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Susan Royal

the vernacular Bible and the lollard tracts that were found in their possession. Norwich Trials , 10. 3 AM , 233. 4 On lollard anti-fraternalism, see Penn R. Szittya, The Antifraternal Tradition in Medieval Literature (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986), 195–198; PR , 46–55. Recent research has underscored connections between Wycliffites and the Franciscans, shading the traditional picture of mere animosity; see, for instance, Ian Christopher Levy, ‘Wycliffites, Franciscan Poverty, and the Apocalypse

in Lollards in the English Reformation
Heather Walton

the light of the family hearth. It must be resisted until it is overcome either by revolution, apocalypse or gnosis. Sands maintains that although these responses appear to be contradictory they are in fact twins born of the same parent. ‘Under pressure rationalism splits into dualism; at ease dualism softens into rationalism. Always one pattern shadows the other’ (1994: 4). Their progenitor is a benefi -cent and ultimately triumphant divine power. In a kaleidoscopic examination of the theodical enterprise from Augustine through Kant to Barth, Tillich and the

in Literature, theology and feminism
A case study in the construction of a myth
S.J. Barnett

all forms of Trinitarian thought, that is to say rejecting Protestantism and Catholicism – something we know Isaac Newton did in his posthumous Observations on the Prophecies of Daniel and the 96 The English deist movement Apocalypse of St John (1733). We also know that Newton’s chronology of priestcraft was very similar to that of such thinkers as Trenchard, Dennis and Howard.32 Rejection of the traditional Christian ministry, then, is no necessary sign of deism. It seems that Unitarians grew in number in late-seventeenthcentury England, although to say that this

in The Enlightenment and religion
Susan Royal

. 35 BC , sigs A8r–B1r. 36 Richard Bauckham, Tudor Apocalypse: Sixteenth Century Apocalypticism, Millenarianism, and the English Reformation: From John Bale to John Foxe and Thomas Brightman (Oxford: Sutton Courtenay Press, 1978), 58. 37 Fairfield, John Bale , 71; King, English Reformation Literature , 63; Gretchen E. Minton, ‘“Suffer Me Not to be Separated, and Let my Cry Come unto Thee”: John Bale’s Apocalypse and the Exilic Imagination’, Reformation 15 (2010): 83–97. 38 Bale

in Lollards in the English Reformation