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Lindsey Dodd

not more than, bombing. Apocalypse could come from the air, but hell could arrive by land, as 1870 and 1914–18 had shown. The Geneva Disarmament Conference was a failure for French hopes of restraint; Hitler withdrew in October 1933, and published details of the increased German military budget in 1934. By March 1935, with all pretence of observing Versailles conditions discarded, a peacetime army of 550,000 men was authorised, and the German Air Force officialised.4 The Rhineland reoccupation in March 1936 brought war a leap closer. It seemed that the ‘ever

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

[…]. It was the apocalypse for a child – no, I don’t know anymore – I think I was told off because my teeth were chattering, because I said ‘I’m scared’, and then [stops, distressed] […]. You had the feeling that the world was collapsing, you said to yourself ‘It’s the end. We’re going to be killed’. I don’t know how I could have thought that at the time, but you didn’t feel you could escape it. In the railway workers’ garden city housing estate of La Délivrance in Lomme, situated just off the Dunkirk road, the raid of 10 April 1944 was v 87 v Experiencing bombing

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Adrian Millar

reinforced by the idealisation of the Other. Catholics are typically perceived as being more together, coherent or whatever, an idealisation that simply enables Protestants to unconsciously reproduce the Catholic threat and the relations of domination and social power. Fear of loss is akin to fear of defeat and the author notes that some loyalists like the certainty of the apocalypse that she

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

‘the beast rising out of the sea described in the Apocalypse’. 122 The ‘Turks’ were seen ‘as a pernicious force sent by God to scourge Christendom from its sins’. 123 Yet in the next century an exception was made: the first alliance between a European state and the Ottoman Empire, upon French initiative, during the struggle between the Habsburg Charles V and Francis I of France, the latter concluding several treaties with Suleyman the Magnificent. 124

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century