Search results

Ireland’s grassroots food growing movement

(Central Statistics Office, 2003; Manchester City Council, 2001). This history of comparatively lower provision of allotments existed in pre-independence Ireland also. In 1916, there were eighty plots in Dublin, compared to 1,200 in Belfast (Hennessy, 2004), even though both cities had comparable populations (see National Archives of Ireland, 2011). Through the 1990s, most of Ireland’s few allotment sites were on public land in the Dublin area. With the formation of local allotment associations, campaigns calling for both the preservation of existing allotment sites and

in Spacing Ireland
Art and the temporalities of geomedia

into the dynamic archive of photographic mapping that is Google Street View.1 Over the course of their lives, most of these automated images – instances of what Joanna Zylinska calls ‘non-human photography’ – will escape serious human scrutiny (Zylinska, 2013). Until April 2014, these lives would have been cut short by updates from the restless fleet of Google’s Street View cars. Since the introduction of a time slider to Street View’s interface, however, such images remain accessible; although with all the millions of miles of road covered, and given the evident

in Time for mapping
A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time

archival research and participant observation, a range of mapping projects have been analysed (see Table 9.1 below). Employing a methodology inspired by the bubble/foam metaphor, for each of these examples might usefully deploy questions documented in Table 9.2. Table 9.1  Archival mapping sources used by author for analysis Mapping project Source Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (2013) VISOV (Volontaires internationaux en soutien aux opérations virtuelles)/ Ushahidi Crowdmap (2013) University of Heidelberg/Ushahidi (2013) StandbyTaskforce/GIS Corps/ESRI (2013) https

in Time for mapping
Concepts and practice

. Globalisation, Societies and Education 2 (2):  231–​275. http://​doi.org/​10.1080/​ 14767720410001733665 Ong, A. (2006): Neoliberalism as Exception: Mutations in Citizenship and Sovereignty. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Orsini, F., Kahane, R., Nono-​Womdim, R. and Gianquinto, G. (2013): Urban agriculture in the developing world: a review. Agronomy for Sustainable Development 33 (4): 695–​ 720. http://​doi.org/​10.1007/​s13593–​013–​0143-​z Ousset, P. J., Nourhashemi, F., Albarede, J. L. and Vellas, P. M. (1998):  Therapeutic gardens. Archives of Gerontology and

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Open Access (free)
Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas

-project suggests that both conventional photography and conventional cartography are essentially inadequate. 120 Stitching memories Figure 5.4  Wolfgang Weileder, Piazza San Pietro, Rome, Slice 1756, 2010, from the Atlas series, 2011–present. Archival inkjet print, 140 x 22cm © Wolfgang Weileder (courtesy of Wolfgang Weileder). This figure has not been made available under a CC licence. Permission to reproduce it must be sought from the copyright holder. Unlike Sugimoto’s work, Weileder presents a consistent interest in the bustling change and fleeting presence of human

in Time for mapping
Abstract only

website and email. The website (www.schnews.org.uk) was re-designed and relaunched in 1998. SchNEWS used internet and email to ease and widen its distribution network, as a space for additional material and links, and to source stories (especially on international issues). Thus SchNEWS uses CMC to help prepare the document itself, to distribute it and to archive it. In April 1998, 500 people were subscribed to the email service of SchNEWS; by the end of 1999 this had grown to 3,000. The SchNEWS website has five 12 Cyberprotest sections: the latest SchNEWS, additional

in Cyberprotest
Abstract only
Postcolonialism and ecology in the work of Tim Robinson

, perhaps, one of the keynotes of Robinson’s entire visual and verbal archive. The geographical, environmental, genealogical and phenomenological definitions cited here are all abundantly present in his work, and indeed, the glaring omission of language – indigenous versus imported and acquired – by DeLoughrey and Handley can be added to this catalogue encountered across Robinson’s works. But Robinson also unearths many of the material realities of Ireland’s history of feudal colonialism. History and oral cultural records memorialise the punitive excess and subversive

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Open Access (free)
Mapping times

be brought to life in digital mapping. These ideas are imbued with vitalism – the notion that some kind of life force beyond science imbues existence (Greenhough, 2010). This emphasis on temporal vitality is reflected in the rise of what has been termed new Bergsonian thought (May and Thrift, 2001), and is crucial for thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze. Deleuzian ideas embody a rhizomatic flowing and folding of temporality. Smith (2013) highlights the ways in which Deleuze freed time, giving it a power to do work, through processes of anticipation, archiving and

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Back to the future

does it mean to reject the clarity of borders between history and experience, between the global stories that build empires and nations into perpetuity (even if only in the archive), and those that build memories and everyday localities? The precise role that digital mapping might play in this process remains to be charted in detail, beyond the cases suggested in our chapters. So a focus on ephemerality and mobilities suggests research agendas that are rather more performative, transient and hybrid than might be imagined in the at times static implications of Barbara

in Time for mapping
Abstract only
Geographies of the post-boom era

absolute terms – the most globalised, the most successful, and so forth. These sentiments were represented in portrayals of Ireland as a knowledge economy that emphasised the liberating capacity of information and communication technology (ICT), particularly from the constraints of geography. In the archive of the boom-time, there is an interview in Business Week with one key figure in the Celtic Tiger story, Mary Harney, the leader of the now defunct right-of-centre political party the Progressive Democrats and then Tánaiste and Minister for Enterprise, Trade and

in Spacing Ireland