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1 Popular music and the ‘cultural archive’ This book began its Introduction, and begins its chapter structure, not in the mainstream of international affairs (the politics of state socialist Non-Alignment, or postsocialist European border control) but with what might seem a more distant topic: popular music. It does so because the everyday structures of feeling perceptible through popular music are a readily observable sign that ideas of race are part of identity-making in the Yugoslav region; proving this point opens the way to revisiting

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Postsocialist, post-conflict, postcolonial?

This book explains theoretical work in postcolonial and postsocialist studies to offer a novel and distinctive insight into how Yugoslavia is configured by, and through, race. It presents the history of how ideas of racialised difference have been translated globally in Yugoslavia. The book provides a discussion on the critical race scholarship, global historical sociologies of 'race in translation' and south-east European cultural critique to show that the Yugoslav region is deeply embedded in global formations of race. It considers the geopolitical imagination of popular culture; the history of ethnicity; and transnational formations of race before and during state socialism, including the Non-Aligned Movement. The book also considers the post-Yugoslav discourses of security, migration, terrorism and international intervention, including the War on Terror and the refugee crisis. It elaborates how often-neglected aspects of the history of nationhood and migration reveal connections that tie the region into the global history of race. The book also explains the linkage between ethnic exclusivism and territory in the ethnopolitical logic of the Bosnian conflict and in the internationally mediated peace agreements that enshrined it: 'apartheid cartography'. Race and whiteness remained perceptible in post-war Bosnian identity discourses as new, open-ended forms of post-conflict international intervention developed.

Open Access (free)
Time and space

pasts of Indian nationalism were often central to such endeavors, on offer equally were other convergences of significance. Especially important were imaginative readings of historical materials: from conventional archival records, including reports of colonial administrators, to earlier ethnographies as sources of history; and from previously maligned vernacular registers of history to diverse subaltern expressions of the past

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
An introduction

archive, both intimately linked to aggrandizing representations of a reified (yet palpable) Europe/West. 3 Second, for some time now, critical scholarship has contested the enduring oppositions – for example, binaries between tradition and modernity, ritual and rationality, myth and history, and East and West – that have shaped influential understandings of the past, key conceptions of culture(s). On the

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Identities and incitements

the abiding imperatives of historical progress and the very nature of the academic archive, each envisioned as an intimate image of a reified West. Second, acute interrogations of dominant designs of a singular modernity, which have simultaneously revealed the contradictory and contingent nature of the phenomena as well as explored contending intimations of heterogeneous moderns. Finally, the placing

in Subjects of modernity

Black European Studies (see Gilman 1982 ; Campt 2004 ) – into the Habsburg Empire. German-language literary, visual and consumer culture was part of the Habsburg South Slav everyday, as Pamela Ballinger ( 2004 : 35) and Maria Todorova ( 2005b : 157) both hint when suggesting the aesthetics of whiteness, blackness and race-as-blood in Germany described by Uli Linke ( 1999 ) might have been disseminated to their regions of interest. Just as scholars trace the production of whiteness through ‘cultural archive[s]’ (Wekker 2016 : 2) of advertising material, travel

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Entanglements and ambiguities

and a significant growth of job opportunities, which have shored up the delineation and development of identifiable social and cultural fields of history writing. At the same time, such spreading out of social/cultural history has been no less the result of abiding yet manifold intellectual interests, archival engagements, cross-disciplinary concerns, and political commitments, including impulses

in Subjects of modernity
Abstract only
Once more, with feeling

chapters will selectively draw out and evaluate certain themes, concepts, and arguments from within the rich archive of critical theory, particularly those of its so-​called ‘first generation’, in order to highlight the latter’s hitherto underappreciated concern with the affective, emotional, and sensate aspects of experience. Chapter  1 sets out the theoretical terrain on which the wider project is based. I begin by revisiting some of the founding tenets of critical theory in the context of the establishment of the Institute for Social Research in the early twentieth

in Critical theory and feeling
Objects, affects, mimesis

firmly rooted in concrete social conditions. More post-​critical fantasies: object-​oriented ontology (or how not to think about objects) As noted at the outset, over the last decade or so, objects have become a central concern for many writers. Trying to philosophically get to grips with the world of objects has become a ubiquitous pastime. In reconsidering some of the ideas from the archive of early critical theory in light of our contemporary moment, one has to acknowledge (if only to lament) the recent rise of OOO or SR. The reasons for my somewhat begrudging tone

in Critical theory and feeling
Open Access (free)

the late twentieth century as an aspirational alternative to the authoritarianism and financial stagnation of late state socialism. The region's imaginations and fantasies of race, sonically and visually undeniable in the everyday ‘cultural archive’, nevertheless reveal shifting rather than stable identifications with race, depending on which aspects of the region's historical experience are mediated through which national and collective identities. Disentangling the relationship between ethnicity, nation and race, and recognising the multiple racial formations

in Race and the Yugoslav region