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Archive Jean-Luc Godard tends to break up any pattern or configuration he gives shape to in his films or whose shape he happens to encounter or discover as it is being formed or perceived through the lens of the camera or at the editing table. The images and sounds in Histoire(s) du cinéma (1988–98) are mostly fragments from other unities cut out from an original context and, even if recognisable, something new. Because these elements are so particular, it makes it difficult to say what precisely they represent or what they might signify beyond themselves. Their

in Film modernism
Open Access (free)

screenable condition. As an archivist at the British Film Institute, I’ll try to explain what survives and why, and some of the really awkward technical, preservation and access problems. I must start with the nature of the collections relating to this period of film history, how they came to be where they are, and what was going on at that time in the international archiving world. The 1950s is a particularly

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood

-visual culture. The international festival circuit now plays a significant role in the re-circulation and re-commodification of ‘old’ and ‘classic’ movies. Taking the form of revivals, retrospectives, special gala screenings, and archive-driven events, the contemporary exhibition of such historical artefacts provides a powerful means of extending cinephilia into the second century of cinema through a process

in Memory and popular film
Empirical, named and implied author

coverage of Britannia Hospital , the assignments of authorship they make can be shaped by the cultural formations within which they work. ‘Anderson’ perceived with archival assistance How should Anderson’s authorship of his films be attributed some twenty years after his death? As Stephen Crofts notes, perceived authors are constructed differently in different times and places probably

in Lindsay Anderson
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The life of Georges Franju belonged to the cinema. Although he was recognised as an important director as soon as his first significant short, Le Sang des bêtes, was shown in Paris in 1948, his reputation as a film-maker has often been and remains eclipsed by the place accorded him in cinema history. In the 1930s, and Franju became the Executive Secretary of the Fédération Internationale des Archives du Film (FIAF), an organisation founded on French initiative. Early in 1940, two years after his appointment as Executive Secretary of FIAF, Franju also co-founded another organisation devoted to the promotion of cinema, the Circuit Cinématographique des Arts et des Sciences. Franju's place in French film history is inseparable from the shape of his career, a long 'apprenticeship' in short films that preceded the eight features he made between 1958 and 1973. This book examines the production context of Franju's courts métrages and offers readings of thirteen of these shorts that group them by theme, rather than chronologically. It comprises preliminary readings of all the longs métrages through the prism of the issue of genre, an approach that has never been applied to most of them. The book tackles the area to which the bulk of existing studies of Franju are limited, his cinematic aesthetics, although it attempts both a new synthesis and an expansion of this field of study. Finally, it investigates gender identities, the structure of the family, and sexualities in Franju's cinema.

recognise them as an invaluable way into the messy traces left by subcultures, DIY and fan cultures, and the politics of identity.4 Archivists on and off-line continue to build new collections, mapping the specifics of a place, scene or group of zine makers. Whether in the most eminent national collections, or more loosely archived on social networking sites, they construct a bottom-up history; irreverent, both textual and visual, recycled and disseminated beyond profit and funding structures. Historians also use zines to disseminate research. Punkademics produce (aca

in Ripped, torn and cut
A celebration

This book offers a startling re-evaluation of what has until now been seen as the most critically lacklustre period of the British film history. It includes fresh assessment of maverick directors; Pat Jackson, Robert Hamer and Joseph Losey, and even of a maverick critic Raymond Durgnat. The book features personal insights from those inidividually implicated in 1950s cinema; Corin Redgrave on Michael Redgrave, Isabel Quigly on film reviewing, and Bryony Dixon of the BFI on archiving and preservation. A classic image from 1950s British cinema would be Jack Hawkins in The Cruel Sea, the epitome of quiet English integrity. Raymond Durgnat's A Mirror for England: British Movies from Austerity to Affluence, which deals extensively with British films of the 1950s, was written in the mid-1960s and was published in 1970. In a 1947 article called 'Angles of Approach' Lindsay Anderson delivered a fierce attack on contemporary British film culture, outlining a model for a devoted politics of creation, well in line with what we would later understand as auteurism and art cinema aesthetics . The war films of the 1950s together constitute the assented-to record of the emotions and moral judgments called upon to set in order those disorderly events. The book also talks about the Festival of Britain, White Corridors, and four Hamer's post-Ealing films: The Spider and the Fly, The Long Memory, Father Brown and The Scapegoat. A number of factors have contributed to the relative neglect of the 1950s as a decade in British cinema history.

Jarman, with whom he worked on four occasions: The Tempest (1979), The Last of England (1985 co-produced with James Mackay), War Requiem (1989) and a segment of the opera portmanteau film Aria (1987). Secondly, I will look in detail at his work as executive producer on Chris Petit’s film An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1982). I will be using resources from Don Boyd’s archive at The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum at the University of Exeter, where I am the curator. Lastly, I will look at some of Boyd’s recent work running the web platform HiBROW, which produces

in British art cinema

continued to use black and white filmstock or to combine small amounts of colour with monotone in the late 1940s much as they had done a decade earlier. Retrenchment and resurgence Amateur activity did not stop entirely during wartime, either among those left at home or among those on active service. Archival records from the Imperial War Museum and other collections attest to instances

in Amateur film
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Meaning and practice, 1927–77

Amateur film: Meaning and practice 1927–77 traces the development of non-professional interests in making and showing film. It explores how amateur cinematography gained a following among the wealthy, following the launch of lightweight portable cine equipment by Kodak and Pathé in Britain during the early 1920s. As social access to the new hobby widened, enthusiasts began to use cine equipment at home, work, on holiday and elsewhere. Some amateurs made films only for themselves while others became cine club members, contributors to the hobby literature and participated in film competitions from local to international level.

The stories of individual filmmakers, clubs and the emergence of an independent hobby press, as well as the non-fiction films made by groups and individuals, provide a unique lens through which contemporary responses to daily experience may be understood over fifty years of profound social, cultural and economic change. Using regional film archive collections, oral testimony and textual sources, this book explores aspects of family life, working experience, locality and social issues, leisure time and overseas travel as captured by filmmakers from northern and northwest England. This study of visual memory, identity and status sets cine camera use within a wider trajectory of personal record making, and discusses the implications of footage moving from private to public spaces as digitisation widens access and transforms contemporary archive practice.