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Italian Narratives and the Late Romantic Metrical Tale

This essay addresses Gothic constructions of Italy by reconsidering Romantic-period literary works that capitalised on stereotypes of the country as a land ridden with violence, vice and dangers. If Gothic discourse ‘pre-scribed’ Italy as a country of terrifying events, Gothic writings also reworked an Italy that was already ‘pre-scribed’ according to hostile notions within a stratified geo-cultural archive dating back at least to the Renaissance. This combination of disparaging images was not created exclusively on the basis of British anti-Catholic feelings and other cultural hostility. Often it originated from Italian documentary sources and, particularly Italian literature, itself the object of increasing scrutiny in the Romantic period. This essay examines the Gothic construction and uses of Italy in verse tales published in the later Romantic period and inspired by Dante‘s Divina Commedia and Boccaccio‘s Decameron, among them Edward Wilmot‘s Ugolino; or, the Tower of Famine, Felicia Hemans‘s ‘The Maremma’, William Herbert‘s Pia della Pietra, John Keats‘s Isabella and Barry Cornwall‘s A Sicilian Story. These narrative poems employ Italy as an archive of Gothic plots, atmospheres and situations, making plain its double status: that of a fictitious, approximative set of geo-cultural notions, as well as that of a repertoire of fictional materials.

Gothic Studies
A ‘Lost’ Epilogue to Maturin‘s Bertram?

This essay discusses the possibility of a new reading of Charles Maturins Bertram; or, The Castle of St. Aldobrandon the basis of a hitherto ignored manuscript, ‘Epilogue’ to the drama found in the archives of publisher John Murray. The essay adds a new chapter to the tormented publishing history of this work and sheds light on the ambiguous and shifting moral and political interpretations given by both Maturin and his audience to one of the most famous Gothic dramas.

Gothic Studies

In The Arcades Project, Benjamin explores the different aspects of nineteenth-century culture, in search of a historical reality to which people can awake in a revelatory act of political consciousness. However, the uncanny effects of his archival approach impinge on this revelatory and sublime process. Rather than revealing the political, economic, and technological latent content of the past, representations of the material object confront consciousness with the unfamiliar and abject forms of the repressed collective unconscious. The Gothic tropes of Benjamin‘s text are the traces of the melancholy haunting his concept of a demystifying revelation of historical and material truth.

Gothic Studies
Hammer Film Studios’ reinvention of horror cinema

investigating its content and the circumstances of its production in order to understand the industrial and cultural structures that guide a project’s development from conception to release. Accordingly, I conduct a close reading of Curse to illustrate how the production and stylistic qualities united by Hammer’s film evoke Shelley’s source material while distancing it from other adaptations. This analysis is complemented by archival research and data gathered from trade journals of the time. These sources shed light on how Hammer’s general business strategies established a

in Adapting Frankenstein

scene from Frankenstein; or, The Model Man (1849) from The Illustrated London News (12 January 1850). Image ©The British Library Board. All Rights Reserved. Image reproduced with kind permission of The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) The Model Man is also notable for its self-awareness, situating itself as one more in a long line of Frankenstein adaptations. The play’s debt to previous versions is implied at times, such as its silent incorporation of alchemy for

in Adapting Frankenstein

download is accessible only in the National Theatre Archive in London. Frankenstein’s Wedding , while it remained ‘live’ on BBC iPlayer for a limited period of time after the initial transmission, has since been deactivated, so that access to the production remains largely confined to the academic facilities of Box of Broadcasts and similar institutional repositories. Scattered fragments are available on YouTube and the digital TV recorders of television audiences who had the foresight to capture the programme and keep hold of it. But neither recorded work is free to

in Adapting Frankenstein
Frankenstein in new media

website (Stuckey, Swalwell, and Ndalianis) and Oliver Grau’s ADA: Archive of Digital Art , amongst others. Thus, while Jackson’s text contributes to the dissemination of Shelley’s mythology in contemporary popular culture and its media specificity is central to its content, this media specificity also represents a potential impediment to its continuing circulation and shelf life. This prospective threat awaits many texts of this technological era that are intensely media specific, including Dave Morris’s Frankenstein app. Dave Morris

in Adapting Frankenstein
The various shapes of Marcus Coates

, since we are provided only with an indication of the colour and size of this creature. As a result, viewers must resort to images and knowledge of this animal archived in their own minds, and the wolf-sized prism becomes a site on to which each individual can project his or her own perceptions of, and attitudes towards, wolves. This single rectangular prism unleashes a pack of imagined wolves in the various minds of those who view the work, demonstrating the subjective ways humanity views these creatures and the very personal way individuals go about conceiving them

in In the company of wolves

Godfrey Wadsworth Turner was the grand-nephew of Edward Wollstonecraft, first cousin of Mary Shelley. 2 The archive.org site lists the following American adaptations: a ten-part serial (1931) produced by George Edwards; a half-hour version (broadcast 8 January 1944) in The Weird Circle anthology series from RCA; another half-version in Ronald Colman’s Favorite Story series (broadcast 13 December 1947); an unaired transcription in the NBC Short Story series (1952); and another version for Suspense! (broadcast 7 June 1955). More

in Adapting Frankenstein
Frankenstein, neo-Victorian fiction, and the palimpsestuous literary past

continue to regard as pioneers of intellectual achievement. Bringing into ‘Hottentots’ all of this and perhaps more, the Frankensteinian fish, like the story itself, becomes a piecemeal archive of narrative that serves both to expand and to deconstruct the tale of which it is a part. This is a hallmark of neo-Victorian fiction and of adaptation itself, which employs familiar narratives to generate new texts that prompt us to re-vision the old. Unsurprisingly, in ‘Hottentots’, this mode of narrative production (or reproduction) is embodied by and

in Adapting Frankenstein