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This book explores the place of memory in post-apartheid South Africa by analysing state sanctioned-performances of the nation. It first explores how the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) archive was created, and what it means to contemporary South Africa. The book then explores creative responses to the TRC. It examines individual narratives that have become iconic; asking why these have been chosen to represent the experiences of the broader majority. It analyses how contemporary cultural practitioners are particularly exploring various non-realistic, highly performative forms in conjunction with verbatim narratives to reflect on diverse lived realities in South Africa. The inherited apartheid archives embody particular narratives of South Africa, especially those that defined separate cultural identities, with their relative worth and histories. The way these archives of memory were constructed and controlled is important, especially insofar as they affected the social structure of the nation, beyond apartheid legislation. The book looks at how at moments of political crisis or transition, specific narratives of history, from particular cultural perspectives, have been performed in public spaces to define national identities. It also explores how Mbeki used the South Africa-Mali project, within the context of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) to extend the imagined boundaries of the nation. Finally, the book explores contemporary popular performance and theatrical engagements with history and memory.

Remembering and forgetting

The TRC’s reconfiguring of the past 1 The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s reconfiguring of the past: remembering and forgetting We are charged to unearth the truth about our dark past, to lay the ghosts of that past so that they will not return to haunt us. And [so] that we will thereby contribute to the healing of a traumatised and wounded people – for all of us in South Africa are wounded people – and in this manner to promote national unity and reconciliation. (Desmond Tutu)1 Because of this very fullness, the hypothetical fullness, of this archive

in South African performance and archives of memory
Abstract only

sessions throughout the country from 1996 to 1998, covering the period from 1960 to 1990. The material from the Commission was reviewed and collated into a seven-volume Final Report, the last of which entered the public domain in 2003. William Kentridge referred to the TRC as ‘exemplary civic theatre, a public 2 South African performance and archives of memory hearing of private griefs which are absorbed into the body politic as a part of the deeper understanding of how the society arrived at its present position’ (1998: ix). This public event challenged many

in South African performance and archives of memory

state-subsidised venues also allows for different kinds of relationships with audiences, beyond the tendency for passive consumption encouraged by a proscenium arch design. This is especially evident in festivals such as Cape Town’s Infecting the City (2008–11),1 which Awelani Moyo argues ‘has   1 See interview with Bailey on ITC (2010b). 172 South African performance and archives of memory attempted to make the arts more widely available to the public whilst stimulating debate about current social issues by making use of the embodied energy and creativity of

in South African performance and archives of memory

compares with how other African countries have approached rewriting their history in the post-colonial context (Neale, 1985). This project takes its starting point from Desmond Tutu’s formulation of post-apartheid South Africa as the ‘rainbow nation’, a formulation that was elaborated on by Mandela (1995) in his first month of office. It was adopted by the ANC as the political symbol of unity for a 134 South African performance and archives of memory country of diverse and divided people. This chapter explores how Mbeki used the South Africa–Mali project, within the

in South African performance and archives of memory
Abstract only
The Voortrekker Monument and Freedom Park

3 Staging a nation: the Voortrekker Monument and Freedom Park The past is never dead. It’s not even past. (William Faulkner, Requiem for a Nun, Act 1, sc. 3, p. 85) The inherited apartheid archives embody particular narratives of South Africa, especially those that defined separate cultural identities, with their relative worth and histories. The way these archives of memory were constructed and controlled is important (Rokem, 2000), especially insofar as they affected the social structure of the nation, beyond apartheid legislation. This chapter looks at how

in South African performance and archives of memory
The role of theatre practitioners in exploring the past

and political story out of this unruly multivocality’ (Coplan, 2000: 138). These challenges have been made in fiction and non-fiction prose as well as in performances, which to date include Mike van Graan’s Dinner Talk (1996) and Green Man Flashing (first performed 2004), PieterDirk Uys’s Truth Omissions (1996), Paul Herzberg’s The Dead Wait (1997), Walter Chakela’s Isithukuthu (1997), Nan Hamilton’s No. 4 56 South African performance and archives of memory (1997), André Brink’s Die Jogger (The Jogger, 1997), Jane Taylor and the Handspring Puppet Company’s Ubu

in South African performance and archives of memory
Tales of four eighteenth-century recipe books

least) four different histories (and thus historiographies). It will consider how the contemporary archival situations in which they are located, the routes by which they arrived there and even the developing, non-physical means of accessing them work to complicate the contexts in which they were produced, and our means of comprehending them. The (at least) four different histories of these

in Reading and writing recipe books, 1550–1800

This review article charts the general direction of scholarship in James Baldwin studies between the years 2015 and 2016, reflecting on important scholarly events and publications of the period and identifying notable trends in criticism. While these years witnessed a continuing interest in the relationship of Baldwin’s work to other authors and art forms as well as his transnational literary imagination, noted in previous scholarly reviews, three newly emergent trends are notable: an increased attention to Baldwin in journals primarily devoted to the study of literatures in English, a new wave of multidisciplinary studies of Baldwin, and a burgeoning archival turn in Baldwin criticism.

James Baldwin Review
An Interview with Raoul Peck

I Am Not Your Negro (2016) takes its direction from the notes for a book entitled “Remember this House” that James Baldwin left unfinished, a book about his three friends—Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.— their murders, and their intertwining legacies. The film examines the prophetic shadow Baldwin’s work casts on twentieth- and twenty-first-century American politics and culture. Peck compiles archival material from Baldwin’s interviews on The Dick Cavett Show, his 1965 Cambridge lecture, and a series of banal images indexing the American dream. Juxtaposed against this mythology is footage of Dorothy Counts walking to school, the assassination of black leaders and activists, KKK rallies, and the different formations of the contemporary carceral state. Our conversation examines Peck’s role as a filmmaker and his relationship with the Baldwin estate. Additionally, we discussed a series of aesthetic choices he fought to include in the film’s final cut, directing Samuel L. Jackson as the voice for the film, the similarities and shifts he wanted to document in American culture since the 1960s, and some of the criticism he has received for not emphasizing more Baldwin’s sexuality.

James Baldwin Review