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Editor: C. E. Beneš

This book provides the first English translation of the Chronicle of the city of Genoa by the thirteenth-century Dominican Jacopo da Varagine (also known as Jacobus de Voragine). While Jacopo is better known for his monumental compilation of saints’ lives, the Golden legend, his lesser known Chronicle of Genoa exemplifies the important medieval genre of the civic chronicle. The work mixes scholarly research about the city’s origins with narrative accounts based on Genoese archival sources, more didactic and moral reflections on the proper conduct of public and private life, and personal accounts of Jacopo’s own experience as archbishop of Genoa from 1292 until his death in 1298. Divided into twelve parts, the work covers the history of Genoa from its ancient origins up to Jacopo’s own day. Jacopo’s first-hand accounts of events in which he himself participated—such as the great civic reconciliation of 1295, over which he himself presided—provide a valuable contrast to the more scholarly and didactic sections of the work. Together they form an integrated, coherent approach to urban history, which illustrates some of the most important styles of historiography in the Middle Ages.

E.A. Jones

place for her support had fallen through at the last moment. Translated from the Latin entry in the register of memoranda of John Dalderby, bishop of Lincoln 1300–20: Lincolnshire Archives, Episcopal Register 3, fol. 10r. In favour of Agnes de Littlemore, laysister of the house of Marlow. John [Dalderby] etc. to his beloved daughters in Christ the prioress and nuns of Marlow, [wishing

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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C. E. Beneš

's wealth of archival documentation, much of which is still unexplored. 9 Hence the abyss between the well-known and extensively analysed GL and the much less well studied career of its author. A few efforts over the years have attempted to bring the two back into alignment. In 1935, E.C. Richardson published two volumes of Materials for a life of Jacopo da Varagine , without ever actually writing the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

Modernised from English documents in the archives of St John’s College, Cambridge. (i) is from the account of the clerk of the works at Collyweston for 1505, SJCA/D91/13, p. 89; (ii)–(iv) are from the account of the cofferer (or treasurer) for 1505, SJCA/D91/20, pp. 156, 179, 183, 184; (v) is from the account of the same for 1506, SJCA/D91/21, p. 30. (i) Payments made the Saturday the 12 day of October [1505

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

Perules, had been the victim of a disastrous fire in which he had lost everything. This is the only record we have of Perules, but the indulgence in his favour evidently had the desired effect: another hermit is recorded here later in the fifteenth century, and the site was still in use in the sixteenth. 28 Translated from the Latin of the register of Thomas Langley: Durham University, Durham Cathedral Archive, Reg. Lang. fol. 217

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

. Translated from the Latin, Lincolnshire Archives Office, Formulary 2, fol. 5r. Letters testimonial on the profession of a hermit according to the Rule of St Paul To all the sons of holy Mother Church to whom these present letters shall come, William [Alnwick, 1436–50], by divine permission bishop of Lincoln, greetings in the Saviour of all. By these letters, we give notice to you all that the reverend

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

the hermits in [ 37 ]) he worked on the road and collected pavage towards his support. 31 A century later, the hermitage seems to have fallen into less worthy hands. (i) is translated from the Latin entry in the Chester sheriffs’ book, Cheshire Archives and Local Studies ZSB 1, fol. 122r; (ii) is translated from the Latin of TNA CHES 2/129, m.1. (i) Item the aforesaid jury on the Monday after the

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

Aldermen of the City of London, Repertory 5’: London Metropolitan Archives COL/CA/01/01/005, fol. 228r; (ii) is from a seventeenth-century transcript excerpted from the vicar general’s register, Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS Tanner 176, fol. 132v; the vow is originally in English and the date clause in Latin. (i) 25 Sept. 1521 At the court of Aldermen came a woman which on Sunday next should be professed an

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
E.A. Jones

rector of Old Romney in 1560. He was dead by 1565. 22 William Tailer’s will (i) is modernised from the English (and the brief note of probate at the end translated from the Latin) in Kent Archives and Local History Service DCb/PRC17/20/30; the entry from the chantry certificate (ii) is modernised from the English in Kent Chantries , edited by Arthur Hussey, Kent Archaeological Society 12 (1936), pp. 261

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only

, explains this archival void. Records of these two Cambridge guilds survived in the archive of the academic college to which, by a deliberate decision, they gave rise. The Cambridge guild of St Mary was founded before 1298; that of Corpus Christi before 1350. In the early 1350s the two guilds joined forces, and in 1352 the brothers and sisters of the amalgamated guild used this society as the means to found a new

in Towns in medieval England