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Jean R. Brink

as his’. 4 Hadfield concludes: ‘We are presented with a fundamental dilemma: either take what appears in the literary works as evidence of the poet's life or abandon any quest for that life and declare that it is unwritable’ (12). Like many who have patiently awaited an archival discovery, the veritable smoking gun that will make all clear about a sixteenth-century figure, I have grappled with the challenge

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
A challenge to the Festival
Florence March

ex machina in As You Like It . I constituted my research object by confronting sources as varied as video and tape recordings (whenever possible), photos, programmes, press packs and reviews, working notes, correspondence and interviews. Although Vilar's productions are the oldest performances in the corpus , they rank among the best documented projects for Vilar was already well aware of the importance of data archiving to build up a budding history of the Avignon Festival. 1

in Shakespeare and the supernatural
Jean R. Brink

, the assumption seems to have been made that everything that could be known about Spenser's early life had been reported, but, now that we are computerizing our archives, there is every likelihood that new records will be discovered. There is no reason to salvage either an aristocratic or a middle-class Spenser. Some puzzles, such as Spenser's precise lineage, are best left unresolved until we are sure that we have sufficient evidence to draw

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
Jean R. Brink

. 2 Mark H. Curtis, Oxford and Cambridge in Transition, 1558–1642 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959), 180–1. 3 Cambridge University manuscripts associated with Langherne (Langhorne) seemed to offer no information on Spenser, but Edmonton archives might prove more useful

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
Spenser’s Busirane and Donne’s ‘A Valediction of my name, in the window’
Yulia Ryzhik

(London: J.M. Dent &Sons, 1985), 70. Subsequent references are to this edition. 2 Donne’s signature is preserved in the ‘marriage letters’, the correspondence between the poet and his father-in-law, George More, in the Folger Shakespeare Library digital archive. The ‘ragged bony’ autograph evokes the skeletal image that Donne conjures in his poem: http://luna.folger.edu/luna/servlet/detail/FOLGERCM1~6~6~32007~102238:John-Donne-s-marriage-letters-inth?sort=call_number%2Cmpsortorder1%2Ccd_title%2Cimprint&qvq=q:donne’s%2Bmarriage%2Bletters

in Spenser and Donne
Abstract only
Spenser, Donne, and the trouble of periodization
Yulia Ryzhik

, especially in the heyday of deconstruction. 12 Donne studies have, of necessity, focused on manuscripts, archival research, and textual criticism, and the ongoing project of the Donne Variorum highlights the enormity and complexity of the task. 13 The Oxford Handbook devotes its entire first section to research tools and resources in Donne studies, approximately 11 per cent of the total page count excluding the frontmatter and index. Spenser studies, by contrast, have focused on publication history, which takes up 5.7 per cent of the page count in its respective

in Spenser and Donne
The poetics of the Epithalamia
Yulia Ryzhik

Veneris , trans. F.W. Cornish, J. Postgate, J.W. Mackail, rev. G.P. Goold (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1913), Poem LXI, lines 8, 165–6, 224–8. 10 Thomas M. Greene, ‘Spenser and the Epithalamic Convention’, Comparative Literature , 9.3 (1957 Summer), 215–28. 11 George Puttenham, The Arte of English Poesie ( London, 1569), 41. Electronic text available at http://web.archive.org/web/20081012044941/ http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/PutPoes.html . All references to Puttenham are to this

in Spenser and Donne
Abstract only
Victoria Coldham-Fussell

’, in The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Archive (Winter 2016 edn), ed. Edward N. Zalta , https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2016/entries/humor/ (accessed May 2019). 14 ‘Reduction’ is more capacious than ‘superiority’ because, although still reflective of the power of normative social hierarchies to generate humour, it incorporates all bathetic and downward-tending comic gestures without presupposing a particular response (as such ‘reduction’ may also be integral to both incongruity and relief). ‘Ambiguity’ captures verbal and visual tensions

in Comic Spenser
The Earl of Essex, Sir Philip Sidney and surviving Elizabeth’s court
Richard James Wood

and Sidney Lee (22 vols., London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885–1900), XIV (1888); online ed., Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Archive. 6 Hammer, ‘Devereux, Robert, second earl of Essex (1565–1601)’, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography , eds. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004); online ed., ed. Lawrence Goldman, October 2008. 7 James, Society, Politics and Culture , p. 416. 8 James delineates the nature of this ‘Sidneian chivalric romanticism’ in the preceding chapter of the same book, which is

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Jean R. Brink

For a description of the archival evidence relative to the Cambridge delegation, see Zillah Dovey, An Elizabethan Progress: The Queen's Journey into East Anglia, 1578 (Stroud: Alan Sutton, and Madison, Teaneck: Fairleigh Dickinson Press, 1996), 34. Dovey corrects the date for Harvey's presentation given in Stern, Gabriel Harvey , 40. 18

in The early Spenser, 1554–80