Search results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • "bamboo curtain" x
  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
Methodist missionaries in colonial and postcolonial Upper Burma, 1887–1966

The first British Methodist missionaries came to Upper Burma in 1887 and the last left in 1966. They were known as 'Wesleyans' before 1932 and afterwards as 'Methodists'. This book is a study of the ambitions, activities and achievements of Methodist missionaries in northern Burma from 1887-1966 and the expulsion of the last missionaries by Ne Win. Henry Venn, the impeccably evangelical Secretary of the Church Missionary Society (CMS), was the most distinguished and inspiring of nineteenth-century mission administrators. Wesleyan missionaries often found property development more congenial than saving souls. In Pakokku in December 1905, a 'weak' American missionary from Myingyan and a couple of Baptist Burman government officials began 'totally immersing' Wesleyans. Proselytism was officially frowned upon in the Indian Empire. The Wesley high schools were extraordinarily successful during the early years of the twentieth century. The Colonial Government was investing heavily in education. A bamboo curtain descended on Upper Burma in May 1942. Wesley Church Mandalay was gutted during the bombing raids of April 1942 and the Japanese requisitioned the Mission House and the Girls High School soon afterwards. General Ne Win was ruthlessly radical in 1962. By April 1964 Bishop was the last 'front-line' Methodist missionary in Upper Burma and the last European of any sort in Monywa. The book pulls together the themes of conflict, politics and proselytisation in to a fascinating study of great breadth.

Abstract only
Michael D. Leigh

A bamboo curtain descended on Upper Burma in May 1942. Little news filtered in or out. The warp and weft of everyday civilian life during the Japanese occupation is something of a mystery. In 1945 Rev. Stanley Vincent compiled an important booklet, Out of Great Tribulation , containing the wartime recollections of Burmese Methodists. 1 Two army chaplains (Acheson and Brown-Moffett) wrote brief accounts of separate visits they had made to the Chin States during 1944. In August 1945 Rev. U Po Tun wrote a long

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
Abstract only
C. Mary Turnbull

’ series. Yet the bamboo curtain in the late 1950s and early 1960s was more transparent and less forbidding than Europe’s iron curtain, as Eric Ambler told in his Passage of Arms (London, 1959). In this amusing and well-told tale about gun-running to Indonesia, Ambler’s American businessman, doing the tourist run in Hong Kong, was surprised at the colony’s defencelessness and the

in Asia in Western fiction
The Ocean group in East and Southeast Asia, c. 1945–73
Nicholas J. White

professional secretary of the union with his ‘obviously political’ interests. 54 Fearing that any further democratisation would ensure that the Chinese-majority island slipped behind the ‘Bamboo Curtain’, and take mainland Malaya with it, Hobhouse demanded in March 1956 that a wider franchise or greater measure of self-government would have to be refused ‘at present’, and that British responsibility for

in The empire in one city?