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Elliot Vernon

settlement with the king, ending ultimately in the unintended consequence of the army becoming an ever-present factor in the politics of the period. This chapter analyses the presbyterian clergy’s dispute with Parliament in 1645 over the authority and jurisdiction of the projected settlement of the church. The reluctance of Parliament to ratify the Westminster assembly’s model of presbyterianism triggered the London clergy to mobilise a campaign for presbyterianism. In so doing, the London ministers encouraged a body of pro

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Michael Carter-Sinclair

liberal electoral strength, so it is a reasonable assumption that they were at least sympathetic to liberalism and its ideals. This assumption is strengthened by a report in the Neues Wiener Tagblatt in October 1873 that ‘its men’ were strongly placed in parliamentary elections that covered Oberdöbling. 31 Since the Tagblatt was strongly liberal, and since elections to various bodies tended to follow similar patterns, this appears to be another indicator of their liberal sympathies. Unlike Father Hulesch, however, some priests were approaching social involvement

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Elliot Vernon

received his punishment penitently. On the scaffold he was expected to admit his crimes, confess his sins and vindicate the state’s authority in executing him for his treason. Many scholars, following Michel Foucault, have noted that early modern executions were stage-managed dramas that sought to publicly exhibit the inscription of the state’s de facto power on to the bodies of its citizens. 93 However, as Lake and Questier’s work suggests, this type of Foucauldian analysis relies on an abstract and structurally

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
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, Manchester was outstripping Chester as a leisure centre by mid-century. The ruling elite was made up of what were often called the ‘principal inhabitants’ as distinct from mere ‘inhabitants’ and ‘inferiors’. 41 Members of this elite appeared in the chief offices of the old Court Leet governing body (boroughreeve and constables) and in the parish offices of churchwardens and overseers of the poor. They appeared, too, as subscribers to the infirmary, the theatre, concerts, and assemblies. But they were also identified

in Manchester Cathedral
Michael Carter-Sinclair

, and many of the smaller states looked to the Habsburgs, as Holy Roman Emperors, for protection. Napoleon, however, abolished the Empire in 1806, and it was never resurrected. As a result, in 1815 a new body, the German Confederation, chaired jointly by Austria and Prussia, brought together all the German states, including Austria – again loosely, and initially for matters of shared commercial interests. From 1815 to the 1840s, a period known as ‘the restoration’ was broadly one of political repression, yet revolutionaries continued to pursue their causes across

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Abstract only
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griffin in S1, the dragon is a theriomorphic combination. The dragon is worse, however, as with its beastly body, its leathery wings, and its fire breathing it combines three of the four elements: earth, air, and fire (and as it is closely associated with its watery cousin the leviathan, it can be seen to cross all four). As the medieval mind thought that God had decreed that every creature should be associated with only one of the four elements, and to be content therein, the dragon, with its transgression to exist in

in Manchester Cathedral
Catechisms and the question of the fundamentals of the faith
Amy G. Tan

damnation. God may punish me, and the devil may enter into me, as he did in Judas, and bring me to destruction both of body and soul: from which evils the Lord deliver us, for his mercy sake. Amen. 39 At a time when debates about the sacraments were often central points of tension between puritan

in The pastor in print
Explication and implication in anti-Catholic publications
Amy G. Tan

of Christ, for Christ, our King and country’. 27 The final epistle, addressed to the Christian reader, comprised a discussion of the letters to the churches in the first chapters of Revelation vis-à-vis Thomas Brightman’s analysis (early readers of the text apparently convinced Bernard that his omission of such content in the body of the work was

in The pastor in print
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number of requests it received to sing at funerals ‘after the old custom’. Sixty years later, details of its business begin to emerge when appointments and dismissals are recorded, together with attempts by the College to impose order and raise musical standards. Commissions for new organs are noted, and the body responsible for each is named. The church had divided loyalties, being both a Collegiate Church and a parish church. As a result, the building was maintained by College and parish, with clear lines of

in Manchester Cathedral
Abstract only
Elliot Vernon

1649, which held that governors were merely the officers, trustees or agents of the people whom they served. This political view had a religious mirror image in those gathered congregations that saw ecclesiastical officers as the representatives of the body of the faithful. Nevertheless, as can be seen from the presbyterian tracts justifying Parliament’s defensive war, presbyterian political theory did put a stress on elected political representatives as the people’s compelling voice in the constitution. In discussions of

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64