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Fifth Estate’s critique of the megamachine

4 Steve Millett Technology is capital: Fifth Estate’s critique of the megamachine Introduction ‘How do we begin to discuss something as immense as technology?’, writes T. Fulano at the beginning of his essay ‘Against the megamachine’ (1981a: 4). Indeed, the degree to which the technological apparatus penetrates all elements of contemporary society does make such an undertaking a daunting one. Nevertheless, it is an undertaking that the US journal and collective Fifth Estate has attempted. In so doing, it has developed arguably the most sophisticated and

in Changing anarchism
Editor’s Introduction

even those inspired by anti-communism were cautious about structural integration into Western security strategies. At the beginning of the 1990s, NGOs shrugged off their scepticism for the morality of state power, working more closely with Western military forces. Private and government funding for humanitarian operations increased. With the help of news media, humanitarian agencies boosted their political capital, presenting themselves as providers of public moral conscience for the West. A new political economy of humanitarian aid developed

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

Introduction 1 On 15 December 2013, only two and a half years after the Republic of South Sudan had become an independent state, the long-simmering tensions between President Salva Kiir and his former vice-president, Riek Machar, erupted into armed clashes in the capital, Juba. War soon broke out. This article seeks to document and analyse violence affecting the provision of healthcare by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and its intended beneficiaries in the early stage of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

community had found its way to the capital, Hargeisa, Somaliland had arguably become the most stable democracy in the region, even as it awaited international recognition of its independence. It seemed to me, therefore, that the most salient question was not how intervention could be more effective and efficient, but whether it was necessary in the first place. Was Western presence itself constitutive of the problems facing ‘host’ countries? In her recent book Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in Mozambique ( 2017 ), Meera

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement

response activities did not work. Prefectural and local authorities, elders and migrant associations in the capital city who tried mediation to facilitate access in the reluctant villages of Kolobengou and Wabengou were assaulted. The Guinean government instructed all of its leading ministry officials to go to Gueckedou, the capital of the prefecture. In order to comply with this call from the government, the Minister of Health, the colonel doctor Rémy Lamah, a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

: Humanitarian Affairs Team – Save the Children ). Fraser , N. ( 2016 ), ‘ Contradictions of Capital and Care ’, New Left Review , 100 , 99 – 117 . Fraser , N. ( 2017 ), ‘ The End of Progressive Neoliberalism ’, Dissent , 2 January , www.dissentmagazine.org/online_articles/progressive-neoliberalism-reactionary-populism-nancy-fraser (accessed 17 July 2017 ). Galloway , A. R. ( 2013 ), ‘ The Poverty of Philosophy: Realism and Post-Fordism ’, Critical Enquiry , 39 : 2 , 347 – 66 . Geotz

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

liberal humanitarian institutions, which have depended on the financial and political capital of the US. Far from promoting a final and permanent peace, the new security strategy situates the US in an inter-state system in which war is possible at any time, in any location, with any rival, enemy or former ally. How might we explain this apparent shift in American strategy? A growing number of analysts, particularly North Americans, consider that we are seeing the end of the post-war liberal order. And they attribute liberal crisis to two fundamental factors

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister

capital and, principally, information technology companies, multilateralism is more useful, is it not? Sure, these companies faced some rules, but they grew most of all during this period of globalisation with increased multilateral cooperation. Things are more chaotic now. It is partly a result of the financial crisis. This affected employment in the US and living standards. In a similar way to Mussolini, who was a more sophisticated person, Trump appealed to the blue-collar worker. He perceived that sectors connected to an old-style capitalism were

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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War economies, peace economies and transformation

approach forces us to recognise that the process of capital accumulation and power relations and imbalances in the geopolitical landscape can themselves be seen as forms of structural violence insofar as periphery regions or persons are exploited in order to ensure the status quo for more dominant, powerful actors. For example, the geopolitical relationships involved in the trade of oil cannot be subtracted from the equation in our consideration of violence witnessed around the drilling of oil in Angola and Nigeria. Thus, in order to transform war economies, the

in Building a peace economy?
The nature of the development-security industry

locale, region and globe. A war economy’s legacy can be felt in three arenas. First, there is a political legacy as central figures of a war economy utilise the financial assets gained to acquire and sustain political power in the post61 4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 62 Building a peace economy? conflict phase. There is also a criminal legacy as ‘criminal capital becomes political capital’ (Andreas, 2004: 44) achieved largely through the continuance of alliances made during the war, a problem which is compounded by the immunity often

in Building a peace economy?