Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 87 items for :

  • Manchester Medieval Sources x
Clear All
C. E. Beneš

, Honoratus, archbishop of Milan, fled to Genoa seeking safety from the arrival of the Lombards, who at that time were still pagans. 25 For within a short space of time the Lombards had taken five provinces: the first of these was called Venetia, which today is called the march of Treviso, and its capital was Aquileia. 26 The second province was called Flaminea, which today is called Romagnola

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

and reserving to the capital lord of the fee such royal fish 39 as might issue there), notwithstanding the statute made against placing lands and tenements into mortmain, 40 or any other cause. In witness whereof, etc. [ witness clause omitted ] Attested by the king at Westminster, the first day of October [1399]. By the king himself. (ii) The building of the lighthouse, 1427 Petition

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

who fled from battle should suffer capital punishment, and whoever allowed himself to be captured alive and armed in battle should remain unransomed. And therefore since he had been captured alive, he should not be ransomed. Furthermore, when his friends begged him not to return to Carthage, he nonetheless chose to return according to his promise and was then very cruelly murdered by the Carthaginians. See how he subordinated his individual

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

after the articles of faith’. 158 He persuaded us with these words to the greatest admiration. But words offered by the spirit are proved by effect: when the aforesaid Conradin entered Apulia, he and all his army were overcome by King Charles and entirely crushed, and Conradin was punished with a capital sentence. 159 In the year of the Lord 1268 the Genoese armed

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only

Countries, such as Arras and Ghent, with which London had economic ties. At the same period a small category of still larger cities was represented by Paris, Venice and Milan. 18 A considerable gap separated London, which by the thirteenth century had effectively established its claim to be the capital of the English kingdom, from Bristol and Norwich, each of which is likely to have contained upwards of twenty

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only

the embroidery. 9 A conspectus of the stock-in-trade of two high-end London shopkeepers [ 29 ] gives an impression of the diversity and sophistication of the wares on offer in the greater towns, to those who could afford them. The commercial pre-eminence of the capital, already marked by 1300 and even more evident by 1500, was apparent in the extraordinary

in Towns in medieval England

other ruins himself with a capital crime so that afterwards he is unworthy to serve at the altar. 5 [2.1] Yet if any priest does so for any other reason, he is to forfeit his status and the fellowship of his colleagues, and he is not to hold mass anywhere until he who properly holds that church possesses it. 6 [2.2] And he who committed that offence

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
Abstract only

(eds), English Historical Documents , ii, 1042–1189 , 2nd edn (copyright © 1981), London: Eyre Methuen, 1981, pp. 1196–201. Latin, transl. by the editors. Reproduced by permission of Taylor and Francis Books UK. Among the noble and celebrated cities of the world, that of London, the capital of the kingdom of the English, is one which extends its glory farther than all the others and

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only

ensure that the bailiffs dealt justly with both rich and poor.     On the same day it was agreed by common consent of the township that there should henceforward be in the town twelve chief ‘portmen’ ( capitales portmenni jurati ), as they are called in other free English boroughs, who will have full authority to govern and maintain the town … And the

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only

penalty or with lahslit , according to the nature of the deed. [4.2] If a man in orders compromises himself with a capital crime, he is to be arrested and held for the bishop’s judgment. 14 [5] And if a man sentenced to death desires confession, it shall never be denied to him. 15 [5.1] And all God’s dues

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York