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In accord with his Roman model, Smith planned to have his colonists construct a central capital, Elizabetha . 5 To gain colonists, he advertised the colonies as a solution to overpopulation, particularly the problem of younger sons who, because of primogeniture, were disinherited in the English inheritance system; this same selling point was later used to advertise the plantations of Munster and Ulster. By a

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
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From E.K. to Roffy’s ‘boye’ to Rosalind

Lying’ and adds that he will never stop berating Spenser until he has rid him of this ‘yonkerly, and womanly’ humour (J1v). Third, Spenser to Harvey, 2 April 1580: again, using Latin for his personal references, Spenser assures Harvey that his sweetheart (‘Meum Corculum’) commends herself to Harvey and wonders why he has not answered her letter. Let Harvey beware lest his neglect become a capital offence for him in her eyes as it surely will be

in The early Spenser, 1554–80
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speaking, the distinction between the three roles is that booksellers provided the capital required for the production of books (which, depending on the type of book produced, could amount to a substantial investment) and subsequently sold them in their shops. Consequently, booksellers took the highest financial risk but also stood to gain most from the success of a book. The role of publisher, which did not strictly exist in the early modern book business, was effectively shared between booksellers and printers, who owned the presses and were responsible for the

in English literary afterlives
The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Twelfth Night

the case in Philanire . This becomes, then, the only known version of the story in which the corrupt official is not merely threatened with capital punishment but put to death, and the execution is reported in gruesome detail. The Argument locates the tragedy of Philanire squarely in having to live ‘depourueue de ses deux maris’ (deprived of her two husbands); 72 the concluding Chorus movingly evokes her cruel loss of hope and her violent sorrow, which is compounded by the grieving of her children. This effect requires not only changing the identity of the initial

in The Shakespearean comic and tragicomic

Greene’s ‘Swanne like songe’, refers only to ‘Greene’ and ‘he’. Then the perspective changes to the first person, when the preface introduces the possibility that the book may in fact not turn out to be a swan-song after all: ‘yet if I recouer, you shall all see, more fresh sprigs, then euer sprang from me’ (A3 b ). The three sentences that follow use the personal pronoun ‘I’ eight times. This includes one peculiar instance (not replicated in the second edition) in which the capital letter ‘I’ is set in roman type rather than the long italic type used throughout the

in English literary afterlives
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Renaissance city of literature

From its Nobel laureates to its literary festivals, modern-day Dublin lives up to its role as a literary capital. The question of whether Ireland experienced a cultural and literary Renaissance has received increasing scholarly attention in recent years. This book extends the discussion by engaging with the specific literary culture of its capital city. It begins with an argument for the internationalised literary culture of late medieval Dublin by an analysis of James Yonge's 'Memoriale'. The citizens of Dublin engaged with and actively read texts imported from London, as Dublin's own printing was limited. The book presents case studies that establish Dublin as an emerging city of Renaissance literature by focusing on Edmund Spenser's political and social connections and by examining the literature of complaint emanating from late Elizabethan Dublin. It analyses the constructed authorial personae of Richard Bellings, James Shirley and Henry Burnell residing in Dublin, and discusses the concepts of literary friendship. Sir James Ware's scholarly achievements are analysed and his extensive intellectual community are investigated, revealing an open-minded Dublin community. In addition to being a representative Renaissance activity, translation was harnessed in the country as an 'instrument of state', as shown by translations of Gaelic poetry. The Renaissance literary production in Dublin had a multi-linguistic character with Latin orations taking place in the Trinity College Dublin. The book also addresses the question of whether the English-language drama composed and staged in Restoration Dublin is most accurately described as Anglo-Irish drama or 'English drama written in Ireland'.

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Introduction Kathleen Miller From its Nobel laureates to its literary festivals, modern-day Dublin lives up to its role as a literary capital. But Dublin’s firmly established literary identity raises questions for scholars engaged in the study of another Dublin – that of the medieval and early modern periods. When, in 2010, Dublin was designated a UNESCO City of Literature, a groundbreaking symposium was organised to address the question of whether Dublin was a city of literature during the Renaissance. In September 2012, scholars met, fittingly, in one of the

in Dublin

living in Ireland’s capital city played a role in his development as a poet.4 After all, Spenser spent considerable time in Dublin, presumably arriving there on 12 August 1580 in The Handmaid along with his new employer, Arthur Lord Grey de   1 C. S. Lewis, The allegory of love (1936; repr. Oxford, 1979), p. 349.   2 Some sections were undoubtedly written earlier: for one possible reconstruction see Josephine Waters Bennett, The evolution of ‘The Faerie Queene’ (Chicago, 1942).   3 For discussion, see W. C. Martin, ‘The date and purpose of Spenser’s View’, PMLA 47

in Dublin
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Writing for the stage in Restoration Dublin

capital consisted overwhelmingly of plays from the London playhouses, there were a small number staged in Dublin during the period that had a particular connection to Ireland. In this chapter, I examine these plays and the personalities that wrote them and assess the degree to which the works can be considered as AngloIrish literature. The playwrights were either of English birth or English heritage but resident in Ireland and I argue that their output falls somewhere between English literature and Anglo-Irish literature; the writers’ identification with the Irish

in Dublin
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distribution. Bourdieu himself had used a system of ‘unilateral hierarchisation’ in his early work to identify the alignment of taste for particular kinds cultural production with other forms of social hierarchy and to establish the distinction between those groups in terms of their access to what he called ‘cultural capital’. For Bourdieu there was a direct analogy between ‘cultural

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England