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Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

photographs gathered by UNMISS showed that the capture of Leer had been immediately followed by the destruction of large parts of the town, primarily by fire, including public infrastructure, markets, churches and local housing ( UNMISS, 2014 : 47). In the days that followed, government armed forces pursued the population in the surrounding areas, forcing the displaced, including MSF staff, to retreat deeper and deeper into the bush. After trying to hide the cars, which were quickly stolen by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

a majority of humanitarian practitioners, we can define it as a commitment to three things: the equal moral worth of all human lives (i.e. non-discrimination on principle), the moral priority of the claims of individuals over the authority claims of any collective entity – from nations to churches to classes to families – and a belief that as a moral commitment (one that transcends any sociological or political boundary) there is a just and legitimate reason to intervene in any and all circumstances where human beings suffer (even if

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Introduction The Real is detectable in pain, loss, lack, confusion, fear, fragmentation, etc., examples of which we have already seen. The wider Catholic community’s experience of the Real is evident in the literature. In Them and Us?: Attitudinal Variation Among Churchgoers in Belfast , the writers note that over two-thirds of church-goers who support Sinn Fein have

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Challenges and opportunities

This book explores the evolving African security paradigm in light of the multitude of diverse threats facing the continent and the international community today and in the decades ahead. It challenges current thinking and traditional security constructs as woefully inadequate to meet the real security concerns and needs of African governments in a globalized world. The continent has becoming increasingly integrated into an international security architecture, whereby Africans are just as vulnerable to threats emanating from outside the continent as they are from home-grown ones. Thus, Africa and what happens there, matters more than ever. Through an in-depth examination and analysis of the continent’s most pressing traditional and non-traditional security challenges—from failing states and identity and resource conflict to terrorism, health, and the environment—it provides a solid intellectual foundation, as well as practical examples of the complexities of the modern African security environment. Not only does it assess current progress at the local, regional, and international level in meeting these challenges, it also explores new strategies and tools for more effectively engaging Africans and the global community through the human security approach.

conflict and stalemate in Northern Ireland on a number of grounds: There is no noticeable correlation between religious convictions and the areas most affected by conflict. Political activists in Northern Ireland do not for the most part use religious labels in terms of their party names and values. Individual politicians who are Catholic either display secular attitudes or roundly criticise the Roman Catholic Church and on

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
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Russian men and 7 per cent of women attended religious services once a month or more; by 1998 that figure had risen to 5 per cent and 13 per cent respectively.11 Such a revival in religious activity did not only benefit traditional Russian religious groups, in particular the Russian Orthodox Church, but also many other groups with origins in the West for which the curiosity factor was even higher. A more important cultural shift than is reflected in the actual rise in church attendance came in the visible presence of many different religious groupings. Some – such as

in Securitising Russia
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reached its summit in 1994 when she became Pro-Vice-Chancellor at Queen’s University, and the first woman to serve in that role. Her academic career did not, however, shut out involvement in public affairs. In 1984, she was a member of the Catholic Church Episcopal Delegation to the New Ireland Forum, set up under the premiership of Dr Garret Fitzgerald (qv). In 1996, in the wake of the widespread disturbances which had broken out over parading, the British government set up the Independent Review of Parades and Marches chaired by Dr (later Sir) Peter North. Here, too

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century
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), Social Attitudes in Northern Ireland: The Fourth Report 1994–1995 (Belfast: The Appletree Press Ltd, 1995), p. 30). 5 This conclusion is in keeping with the views of Mary Harris, The Catholic Church and the Foundation of the Northern State (Cork: Cork University Press, 1993), p. 16. Harris

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Security and insecurity in Indonesian Aceh and Papua

activists, mostly people who had not been associated with the OPM – from the churches, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and universities as well as from within the Indonesian bureaucracy and adat (customary, or tribal) leadership – rapidly mobilized support for independence. In February 1999 a group of 100 elite Papuans met with President Habibie and startled him when they

in Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific

, they just don’t practice. Maybe born on that side of the fence, like, but just because they have been born to a Protestant woman and a Protestant man – they have never been to church in their lives – doesn’t make them Protestants so they are just working class people, you know, who probably read the only newspaper delivered to the shop, you know, and, and

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict